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Customer Review

93 of 97 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The cornerstones of our culture, May 24, 2000
This review is from: Albion's Seed: Four British Folkways in America (America: a cultural history) (Paperback)
As with several other people, the biggest complaint I have with this book is that Prof. Fischer hasn't yet followed up with further works on U.S. cultural history.
But what's here is marvelous. Fischer traces the distinctive folkways and religious influence of the four great waves of English emigration to the American colonies, and shows how they combined to make modern USAmerica.
I have 19th century immigrant roots, and have never lived in the South or New England. I can't therefore confirm or dispute what Fischer and the various reviewers say about the distinctive regional U.S. differences that persist there today, and how they go back to the original English immigrants. But as a modern USAmerican from California, I can see the various strands that make up our general culture in each of the four founding regions.
This is a long book, perhaps a bit too long, but I recommend it highly, and since discovering it I automatically read any book Fischer produces. I have yet to read a bad one by him. Now let's have further volumes in the series!
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Showing 1-2 of 2 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Dec 7, 2014 5:16:11 PM PST
This doesn't just trace English emigration, it also looks at the great migration of Scots and Ulster Scots. England and Scotland were two completely different countries until the Act of Union in 1707. Since then they have both been part of the British UK.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 8, 2014 3:39:48 AM PST
You're right, I should have said British, not English.
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