Customer Review

77 of 90 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars WOW, April 22, 2013
This review is from: TRENDnet Wireless AC1750 Dual Band Gigabit Router with USB Share Port, TEW-812DRU Version 2.1 (Personal Computers)
First off, let me start by saying I know very little about networking. I know how to set up a router and access it, but after that im not too smart on the subject. I decided to write this review and give others my opinion on this product. I was running an old Motorola 5101 modem attached to a DLink DIR-615 N300 wireless router. I have a true 3-story house and this equipment was installed in my basement where all my coax cables were split and distributed. Before installing my new Motorola 6141 modem and TRENDnet router I decided to run a speed test from Speedtest.net. Wirelessly I was averaging 12 down/3 up and for a long time I was very happy with that. My kids (via Actiontech powerline adapters) were getting just under the same specs. When I plugged in my new equipment...BOOM! wireless N on the 2.4GHz band was running >17 down>6 up, then I tuned into the 5GHz band. I moved to my bedroom which is farthest from the modem and used an ASUS EA-N66 adapter...>32 down>12 up! I couldnt believe how much faster I was running. It seems as if websites are coming to my computer before my computer has the chance to process it! Oh yeah, the kids powerline adapters are now getting them upwards of 22 down/9 up.

This product performs very well and was extremely easy to setup. I purchased from another site as they beat out Amazon by $10.00 with a coupon but now it is the same price at both retailers.
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Comments

Tracked by 5 customers

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Showing 1-10 of 11 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Jun 21, 2013 12:36:38 PM PDT
Aleksey says:
Don't use Internet speed tests to test router speeds. Benchmarking LAN performance via WAN is completely useless and misleading.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 5, 2013 8:00:01 PM PDT
[Deleted by the author on Oct 5, 2013 8:02:54 PM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 6, 2013 10:57:13 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 6, 2013 10:58:21 PM PDT
How do you do it? You know since you just bashed on the guy instead of telling him how to get a good test. Internet tough guy.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 9, 2013 1:39:50 PM PDT
DS says:
Yeah, wasn't a very nice way to say it, but in essence it is correct, after reading this post the 1st thing i thought of was that the new new modem probably improved his INTERNET speeds ... one way to test local lan speeds is to NOT hook any modem and using the old router, connect the router thru an Ethernet cable then to another computer thru the wireless connection and map a network drive from one computer to the other ... copy a very large file and then a group of smaller files, using something like the performance monitors in the task manager will give you some baseline speeds ... then hook up the new router and repeat the tests (still leaving the modem out of the test).... alway use the same files and the same procedure ... compare the results and this will tell you what if your LAN speeds increased with the new router ..... now hook up the old modem to the new router and run speedtest.net and then the new modem to the new router and run again, my guess is that you got an internet speed increase with the modem though there may be some just with a newer tech model, say if you went from DOCSIS 2 to DOCSIS 3 ... just my 2 cents

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 9, 2013 2:44:35 PM PDT
MadPB says:
I've had good enough benchmarks in the past (and this was back in 10baseT days) copying large files back and forth as the previous comment suggests.

Nowadays, I've done similar tests using ISO files like the Windows 2012 or Windows 8 images from Microsoft. They're several gigabytes in size and you'll get a fair idea of what the network saturation is like. While I'm mentioning Windows 8 and 2012, in the Task Manager for both of those, there's an updated graph that shows network speeds and current throughput. Much improved over the one in Windows 7 and below, I think.

I don't use the Explorer file copy to test... rather, I use Robocopy from a command line and it tells you when it's done what the copy times were, including the bytes/second. Multiply bytes/second by 8 to get the bits per second, if you didn't already know that.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 9, 2013 3:20:18 PM PDT
Aleksey says:
Bashed? I evaluated his benchmarking method, accurately. And the hint as to how to do it properly was within my reply. Test LAN performance on LAN, not on WAN. Copy a large file from one networked PC to another, watch the speed on the copy window.

Elementary.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 19, 2013 7:31:11 PM PDT
H. Haddock says:
Why?

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 19, 2013 7:47:08 PM PDT
Aleksey says:
When you test your wi-fi speed, you're testing, first and foremost, your router's LAN (local area network) performance on the wireless spectrum.

Testing LAN speeds via WAN (your Internet) will cap your results with WAN speed, and in most cases people's LAN speeds are higher than their WAN speeds.

Therefore such a method would actually return your top WAN speed as opposed to your top LAN speed, misrepresenting the performance of your router.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 19, 2013 3:25:25 PM PST
[Deleted by Amazon on Dec 19, 2013 10:42:06 PM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 19, 2013 4:57:05 PM PST
[Deleted by the author on Dec 20, 2013 1:00:43 AM PST]
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Location: Omaha, NE USA

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