Customer Review

26 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Challenging, yet rewarding read, February 14, 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Ways of Reading: An Anthology for Writers (Paperback)
I had to read this book for my upper division journalism class this fall and found it to be one of the best books that we used in the course. The editors have tried to collect well-written, intelligent documentaries that challenge traditional connections between words and photographs.

Included are Edward Said's inspiring piece about the Palestinian holocaust and exile, a piece by Roland Barthes about the meaning of photograph, "Let Us Speak Now of Famous Men," and many others. Although some pieces are better than others, Barthes' piece is more exciting and informative than Marianne Hirsch's writing on the way that children are used in photography. Over all, the collection is a rewarding and challenge book that could be used for any upper division class. (Maybe the reason that previous reviewers did not like the book is that it was not intended for first year college composition classes.)
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Showing 1-2 of 2 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Dec 16, 2011 1:23:15 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 16, 2011 1:24:25 PM PST
Actually, it is intended for use in first year comp classes: when I was in grad school, one of the authors of the book came and spoke to us about how a freshman class can be designed around the book.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 26, 2012 3:59:31 PM PDT
Adam, is correct. It is a freshman composition textbook. In my composition classes, I used it off and on for 15 years. It's one of the best textbooks around. I think it is also appropriate for upper division courses. The readings are challenging, which is what a college level reader should do: challenge students to think critically about important ideas and concepts.
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