Customer Review

358 of 393 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Cuisinart DLC-8S is Shoddy Shadow of former Cuisinarts, December 6, 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Cuisinart DLC-8S Pro Custom 11-Cup Food Processor, White (Kitchen)
My 1987 DLC-7 is my 3rd Cuisinart. It has had daily use and is worn and has a small problem. I ordered the DLC-8s only to find it cannot compare to my old machine even in it's state of advanced age and I am returning it. For example the cord is short and light weight. The bowl is actually smaller...11 cups is really an exaggeration. The motor is 5.2 amps compared with the 6 amps of the DLC-7 and the DLC-8S is lighter. The deciding flaw however is the poorly designed switching arms on the feed tube. They are flimsy and an accident begging to happen. I am going to have my old machine repaired and look at the Kitchen Aid processors. Very sad to lose an outstanding product.
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Comments

Tracked by 5 customers

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Showing 1-10 of 31 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Jan 4, 2009 1:37:17 PM PST
Carole Ann says:
I have the DLC-7 Cuisinart and I just broke the plastic piece that fastens the lid to the bowl. Since I have had my machine for 24 years they no longer make the exact lid. Now I need to order the bowl, lid, and feeder for a cost of $140. I was thinking about buying a new one but after reading the negative comment above about the DLC-8S, I am NOT going to purchase a new one, but I will order the parts for my old one. Thank you fo much for the help.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 14, 2009 9:53:45 PM PST
Umbagog says:
I would give epoxy a try. My spindle wears out and I build it up with epoxy and that works very well, with good epoxy. I recommend Marine Tex. If you have one of those hobby grinders, you can make a slight groove along the crack and carefully run a bead of epoxy in it and see what you get.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 14, 2009 9:55:34 PM PST
Umbagog says:
I would give epoxy a try. My spindle wears out and I build it up with epoxy and that works very well, with good epoxy. I recommend Marine Tex. If you have one of those hobby grinders, you can make a slight groove along the crack and carefully run a bead of epoxy in it and see what you get.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 25, 2009 8:32:27 AM PST
L. Kirby says:
Kitchen Aid KFP-750 has 12 cup capacity and is top rated by both Cook's Illustrated and Consumer Reports . . . I am in the same boat as you, 21-year-old Cuisinart made in Japan (not China) but replacement parts are prohibitive and I will not support the company if they gouge loyal customers! My research also included talking to those who have newer mixers and I got rave reviews on the Kitchen Aid . . . sadly, the Cuisinart has lost their edge by literally, 'cutting' corners . . . Linda in Wisconsin.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 6, 2009 9:54:09 AM PST
A. Siler says:
I, too, have a 25 year old 7 cup Cuisinart that is nearing its end. After reading reviews, I see that the Kitchenaid has some flaws that would not be acceptable, though. I am looking for a larger machine that will do piecrust. Has anyone used a Kitchenaid for that purpose and loved it? I don't think the new Cuisinart will get my vote.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 5, 2010 2:02:56 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Sep 5, 2010 2:15:27 PM PDT
NewsView says:
Perhaps the cost of replacement parts for these older Cuisinart food processors are prohibitive but I can think of something even worse: no access to replacement parts at all. I have a perfectly good heavy duty food processor built some 20+ years ago by another company and no such luck locating any replacement bowls, blades or the like.

I agree with others who have noted the older products were made better. However, I don't agree that a competing current product will offer a vast improvement. I owned and returned a KitchenAid food processor due to a serious design flaw reported in other reviews here on Amazon wherein the blade can become embedded in the plastic bowl, and a second issue wherein liquids -- food or just normal washing -- become entrapped in the clear plastic handle on the bowl (which can eventually mold because they don't dry out). The other "design flaw" is that you must use the larger capacity bowl even when you only need the smaller capacity one (on models that come with more than one size bowl). Hence, you have 2x the cleanup, and if the "parent bowl" breaks you can't get by on the smaller one, either. My research has indicated that one of the best loved food processors was actually built by Braun, but they're not manufacturing them anymore. Another promising possibility is a current model by Viking but they are pricey.

Cooks Illustrated and Consumer Reports only tests what is available on the market at any given time, and that -- in my opinion -- is typically a relative comparison between "bad and worse" (in terms of today's quality). If you have something older that looks a bit worse for wear but still works, by all means do yourself, your wallet and the environment a favor and continue to use it because you won't find better quality in today's electrics. Weight alone is an indicator. The lighter the weight the less likely durable parts have been used. Manufacturers will slap an attractive stainless steel trim on a product or appliance only to use inexpensive plastic gears in the motor, where it really counts. They apparently don't expect modern consumers to be smart enough to check. Compare that to the way everything was sold in the 1950s/'60s when popping open the hood of the car or showing off the heavy duty motor in the appliance was a routine part of a sales pitch. No more. It's all about the externals and the "name brand trust" that we remember growing up. Except most of these name brands have switched hands many times and are owned today by multinational conglomerates or holding companies. Consumers need to go back to basics and demand that these familiar names prove themselves on today's market. It's no longer enough that it was a brand grandmother knew and loved. Take Sunbeam. The company actually went bankrupt in the 1990s and exists now only as one of many badges an entirely different manufacturer produces. (Same for Rubbermaid and countless other brands following the decades-long "Walmart squeeze" on American manufacturers who resisted the use of murky foreign components of unknown safety/quality and even shadier labor practices at off-shore manufacturing plants.)

In general, this is true for ALL appliances and electrics: The older ones were built of heavier materials, real metal gears, more powerful motors, etc. Don't even get me started on all my name brand major appliances that have required multiple service calls. My "rant", if you will, is born of regret for replacing my ancient but functioning washer, dryer, refrigerator earlier in this decade. I am now a big believer in extended service contracts because most likely they will pay for themselves in the form of countless service calls over a 5-10-20 year period. Manufacturers, it seems, have figured out that there is less money to be made when a product lasts 20+ years. They want consumers back in the market faster than that. And they've pretty much got our "shopping psychology" down pat: We pay less for today's electrics & appliances that are imported from the Third World but pay more, in the long run I suspect, when electronics and appliances, big and small, break down or require outright replacement on faster intervals. (Which also begs the question about how serious these companies are about "going Green". A product that lasts is one less piece of garbage in a landfill or Third World "recycling" heap.)

The answer (IMHO): Let manufacturers of large and small appliances know that we're "on" to emphasis on window dressing (slick exteriors) over durability and functionality. Let them know that as shoppers we want more domestic manufacturing in support of our own economy, retail and job market here in the U.S. A renewed emphasis on quality and domestic production will solve a whole host of problems -- not merely the obvious one involving the failure of a given product to live up to our hopes and expectations.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 23, 2010 11:32:38 AM PDT
Extremely well said.

Posted on Oct 21, 2010 6:30:05 PM PDT
Busy Mom says:
Very well said, and thank you! Please post this as a review so that more people see it. :-)

Posted on Nov 27, 2010 5:33:49 PM PST
cancel says:
I totally agree with this review. I had to get the feed tube replaced twice because of cracks happening at the same location.
Cuisinart is not what it used to be by a long shot. I am looking into Kitchenaid to replace it.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 29, 2010 3:19:10 PM PST
garlictown says:
My sentiments exactly. We NEED to all demand better product manufacturing and we NEED to demand that it all be brought back to the United States of America.
No more third world crap, bring back the good old appliances.
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