Customer Review

319 of 339 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Linksys Has Some Competition! (See updates at the bottom), November 10, 2008
This review is from: D-Link DIR-825 Extreme-N Dual-Band Gigabit Router (Personal Computers)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
I am a Linksys person and I teach a Wireless course using Linksys products. I have been using Linksys products since their 802.11b wired routers first became available. I recently purchased the WRT610N and after trying this D-Link, I am sorry I chose the Linksys WRT610N.

As my first D-link product, I failed to realize D-link uses a 192.168.0.1 network address for its router. I am used to 192.168.1.1 on Linksys products.

PROs:
It is a Dual-Band wireless router, just like the WRT610N. It allows you to schedule wireless access. It has a great manual, which even tells you how to hook up one router to another for extending coverage. I was surprised to see this. I like being able to adjust power output of wireless radios. I love the idea of Guest wireless internet zones. It allows guests, such as friends, to get on your network without having access to local resources or giving out your normal SSID/Password.

It clearly has more options than the Linksys WRT610N, which can be seemingly less user freindly and requires more knowledge of networking. The web configuration screens are similar to Linksys screens though. Anyone familiar with Linksys can find their way around. I did not try the setup CD. Instead I manually configured it using the web interface.

I did not experience any of the instability issues I had with WRT610N. With a Lenovo T61, Apple TV, iPhone, two Macs, a PS3, and a PC connected to a Buffalo LinkStation Gaming Adapter, I needed to find the least common denominator wireless settings in order for all of these devices to connect and stay connected successfully. There were just too many disconnects, which necessitated the least common denominator approach. This approach meant I had to choose "Mixed BG" instead of "mixed (which includes n), had to set channel width to 20, and had to use Tkip WPA only. The D-link allowed me to use all three speed grades (B, G, and N) with WPA or WPA2 (becuase it autodetects the best encryption method available with client devices). I was also able to set the Channel Width to auto (40 or 20 depending on the clients).

CONs:
It only allows up to 63 alpha characters for the wireless passphrase/password. I prefer 64 hex character passwords.

The menus are a bit more complex, which could be an issue for some.

Only one person at a time can access a USB hard drive attached to the D-Link wireless router. Many can access the USB hard drive hanging off of the Linksys WRT610N.

OVERALL:
This is a great wireless router. I tested it as a drop-in replacement for my Linksys WRT610N (after changing the subnet to 192.168.1.x) and it performed admirably. If you are looking, I would consider this strongly before purchasing any other brand.

DECEMBER 2009 UPDATE: When my company moved to a webpage-based VPN solution (we have to access a webpage and login which then opens up the tunnels), I discovered that the firmware version (1.01) I had caused issues. I upgraded to version 1.12NA and now I am experiencing daily wireless connectivity dropouts on the 2.4 ghz band. The only solution thus far is to restart the router. This new development has been detailed across the web. I am going to try some of the suggestions, such as any one or a combination of...disabling DNS Relay, disabling IPV6 on client computers, downgrading to 1.11.

SECOND DECEMBER UPDATE: After disabling the DNS Relay, I have been running for over a week with no issues.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No

[Add comment]
Post a comment
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Amazon will display this name with all your submissions, including reviews and discussion posts. (Learn more)
Name:
Badge:
This badge will be assigned to you and will appear along with your name.
There was an error. Please try again.
Please see the full guidelines here.

Official Comment

As a representative of this product you can post one Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
The following name and badge will be shown with this comment:
 (edit name)
After clicking the Post button you will be asked to create your public name, which will be shown with all your contributions.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.  Learn more
Otherwise, you can still post a regular comment on this review.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
 
System timed out

We were unable to verify whether you represent the product. Please try again later, or retry now. Otherwise you can post a regular comment.

Since you previously posted an Official Comment, this comment will appear in the comment section below. You also have the option to edit your Official Comment.   Learn more
The maximum number of Official Comments have been posted. This comment will appear in the comment section below.   Learn more
Prompts for sign-in
 

Comments

Tracked by 4 customers

Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-10 of 17 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Dec 1, 2008 9:35:52 PM PST
"I like being able to adjust power output of wireless radios. I love the idea of Guest wireless internet zones. It allows guests, such as friends, to get on your network without having access to local resources or giving out your normal SSID/Password."

REALLY!!?? Those are truly terrific options.

Good review.

Posted on Mar 25, 2009 10:39:07 AM PDT
Hi voiceoverthewall.com,
Just a comment with your dependency on the default IP address of either Linksys and/or D-Link. If you are teaching a wireless course, as a safety precaution, you should refrain from using a default IP provided by any router devices and most especially with wireless routers. Just as you've mentioned, you know by default that the Linksys routers use 192.168.1.x and anyone who wishes to hack a wireless signal, most especially for those who do not setup their passwords and disabling the SSID broadcast, I know right away that your router is 192.168.1.1. I can easily penetrate the router's security.

As a precaution/added security, it is best practice to change at least the 3rd octet... e.g. 192.168.56.x to throw someone off. Plus, make sure that there's a password to your router.

Just my 2 cents.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 1, 2009 3:27:36 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 1, 2009 9:32:06 PM PDT
Dear Chito: It's generally too easy to get the IP addresses (esp on a DHCP router) and the SSID to make changing or hiding them of any real value (see, for example, http://blogs.technet.com/steriley/archive/2007/10/16/myth-vs-reality-wireless-ssids.aspx). The lack of hexidecimal characters has a bigger impact - but, it's most important people simply do not use repeated sub-passwords (such as repeating a 8 character password over and over).

Dear Jacob: I think the most cool security feature of this router for the common person is that the Basic WEP used by wireless printers (as well as the potential inter-vendor WAP/2 incompatibilities with guest laptops) doesn't force all the other wireless computers to use a less secure protocol as well (but, I think the WRT610N minimally does two networks as well - it's just I believe, as voiceoverthewall points out for all the different hardware he owns, whose long list is missing both of the more common problems of a wireless printer and Wii, the DIR825 does it better).

Posted on Apr 2, 2009 8:19:05 PM PDT
-1 says:
I have to wonder why you'd prefer 64-hex-char passwords. Those passwords are "only" in the range of ~115-130 bits (in terms of password strength), whereas 63-char alphanumeric passwords (with spaces and special chars) are easily in the range of ~330-350 bits.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 17, 2009 7:03:20 PM PDT
Shopper:

All I am suggesting is not to rely on the default and at the same time, not to broadcast the SSID. You are correct that it will not be that difficult but why make it easy by not changing it and hiding the SSID? If you hide the SSID, it will at least become a challenge for the person attempting to connect. He will at least will try to figure out the SSID first and then the password and only then he might get an IP and from there, he will be able to see the gateway which is normally the router. If the router has not password, then you are really inviting trouble.

I am not here to argue if anyone should change the default IP or not. All I am saying as a bottom-line, make it a bit more difficult for the person who is trying to hack your network. Leaving your wireless signal open is just like letting your front door open to your house while you are away without anybody else left to keep an eye to your home.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2009 7:08:18 AM PDT
Cory Nelson says:
I'm not sure where you got your numbers. The correct algorithm is log2(n^k), where n is the number of unique characters (16 in hex's case, 95 printable in ASCII's) and k is the total number of characters. Therefore 64-char hex gives 256 bits of data, while 63-char ASCII (assuming printable chars only) gives about 413 bits.

The trick, though, is that they are both potentially equally secure. The ASCII variant will be hashed into a 256-bit AES key, while the hex variant specifies the 256-bit key directly.

</geek out>

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 2, 2009 8:51:22 AM PDT
What is the value of running WEP and WPA2 simultaneously? If one of them is compromised, isn't the whole system compromised?

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 15, 2009 6:15:21 AM PDT
Scott H. says:
I would never advocate using WEP, however if you setup the Guest zone only using WEP and disable bridging to your LAN, the only thing someone who breaks your WEP key can do is browse the Net.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 16, 2009 12:38:13 PM PDT
That's fine if the weak link is a laptop that only needs internet access. Doesn't work if the weak link is a Wifi printer that only supports WEP.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 27, 2009 10:36:49 AM PDT
https://www.grc.com/passwords.htm
‹ Previous 1 2 Next ›

Review Details

Item

3.2 out of 5 stars (432 customer reviews)
5 star:
 (144)
4 star:
 (82)
3 star:
 (47)
2 star:
 (39)
1 star:
 (120)
 
 
 
$249.95
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Reviewer


Location: United States

Top Reviewer Ranking: 1,570