Customer Review

51 of 54 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Notes from an iPhoto user, November 3, 2011
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This review is from: Adobe Photoshop Elements 10 [OLD VERSION] (Software)
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I installed Photoshop Elements 10 on my 2.8 GHz i7 iMac, running System 10.6.8. Since many reviewers have thoroughly discussed the features of Photoshop Elements already, I am focusing this review on my experiences with using the application in conjunction with Apple iPhoto.

Background
*My main camera is a 7-year old "prosumer" Nikon. Back when my camera was new, digital SLR's were primarily targeted to professionals and compact digital cameras had extremely limited functionality. Even though prosumer cameras aren't a significant presence in today's digital camera market, these cameras still produce better images than most current compacts due to their relatively large image sensors.
*I also have a collection of images that were scanned from 35mm film prints. Many of these pix have faded colors as well as digital artifacts from the scanning process.

My review perspective
*I use iPhoto as my main photo repository and for simple tasks such as cropping, straightening, and basic exposure adjustments. I want to use Photoshop Elements to do things that are beyond iPhoto's capabilities, including correcting lens distortion on wide-angle shots, cleaning up and enhancing scanned photos, and making extensive alterations to images (such as removing an unwanted bystander from an architectural shot or blurring a distracting background).

Installation
*Total installation time was about 25 minutes.
*Users of Little Snitch (a network security utility) need to approve connections to Adobe servers at several points during the installation process.
*Adobe Elements Organizer 10, a bundled image indexing and organizing program, can import your iPhoto library automatically but creates duplicates of your photos. If you're low on hard drive space, you probably won't want to use Elements Organizer.

User experience
*Photoshop Elements is a feature-laden and complex application. As a result, it has a steep learning curve, especially for Mac users. Much of the user interface is un-Mac like. It takes some time to become accustomed to how the program functions.
*Fortunately, the Help system is extensive and includes many step-by-step guides.
*Once you become comfortable using the program, it's a powerful tool for editing and manipulating photographs. In many ways, Photoshop has transformed photography. Now, instead of worrying about exposure, composition, and everything else when you're out shooting, all you need to do is get a halfway decent image of your subject. It's now possible to manipulate pretty much every aspect of a picture in post-processing as long as you have an in-focus image and sufficient pixels to work with.
*The program does everything I wanted it to do initially and, even better, has opened up many new ways to be creative with my photos. The extensive collection of effects, filters, advanced exposure controls, and editing tools has reignited my interest in photography.

Bottom line
*Photoshop Elements is an outstanding application for photographers who need more advanced tools than iPhoto provides. The only real downside for Mac users is that Photoshop Elements is time consuming to learn and requires regular use to maintain one's skills. Four stars.
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Showing 1-4 of 4 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Aug 8, 2012 6:26:12 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 8, 2012 6:28:44 PM PDT
Very helpful information and you sound like you know what you are talking about. Question: I need to take photos of old postcards for publication in a book. Some of these postcards are photoprints (meaning they are not the actual photo, just a print of the photo). Apparently there is some sort of layering or screen on these cards which will show up when the image is printed on paper unless you have a tool in your editing to make it disappear. Do you know if PSE 10 has such a tool?
Thank in advance!

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2012 8:13:59 PM PDT
korova says:
Thank you for your comments on my review.

For your question, are you referring to the moiré effect? If so, I believe the "median" noise filter in PSE 10 can reduce/remove moiré patterns. I don't have any direct experience doing so, however (I very rarely scan or photograph printed images).

You probably can find a great deal of information about moiré and the associated PSE workflow, though, by using your favorite search engine. Have fun and good luck!

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 9, 2012 6:35:12 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 9, 2012 6:36:02 AM PDT
You were right on the money. I had heard the term but for some reason forgotten it! Thanks to your clarification, I am finding all sorts of very helpful hints on the internet on how to "descreeen" moire patterns when I am scanning images! Thanks again!

Posted on Aug 12, 2012 5:36:22 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 12, 2012 7:16:21 PM PDT
"Now, instead of worrying about exposure, composition, and everything else when you're out shooting, all you need to do is get a halfway decent image of your subject": this is what malicious marketing people in the image processing software business have been insinuating for years. This unscrupulous misrepresentation has helped creating the wide-spread impression in the general public that "image manipulation" is what digital photography is all about. Meaningful photography is a combination of creativity, hardware, software, and knowledge of human visual perception. Screw up your choice of a compelling subject, light quality, composition, exposure, and focus and you get a lousy picture that no piece of software, level of technical knowledge and amount of processing will be able to turn into a worthy image. It is comforting that the Photoshop "gurus" at the National Association of Photoshop Professionals, of which I am a member, share this view in full. You know that you have a good (Raw) picture when it takes you little time to develop it in your image processor, no matter which one you use. 99% of the time you should be able to do all your work in Camera Raw or any other professional converter. The longer the processing, the more desperate the original photo is. If you are not a professional photographer, Photoshop Elements is a terrific value for the money because, quite probably, it offers you more that you will ever need. This is what I recommend to my students (I am a fine art photographer with more experience that I care to admit, have a background in electronic engineering and do some teaching). There is nothing wrong with enjoying your time at the computer but, if you really want to become a better photographer, spend your time and money attending some reputable field workshops.
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