Customer Review

542 of 651 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Afghanistan, The Taliban, and Family Love, May 21, 2004
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: The Kite Runner (Hardcover)
"The Kite Runner" by Khaled Hosseini is one of those marvelous books that opens up our hearts and minds. This book puts a name and face to the people we are helping to free. This is a book at once so magnificent,it is difficult to comprehend and describe. How could we be fighting for freedom in this far off land, Afghanistan, and not understand the people; their heritage, their land and what they lost?
This book transports us to a very different time in the 1960's. Amir and Hassan, friends, raised in the same household, but in different worlds. Amir is the son of a wealthy businessman, and Hassan is the son of the servant, Hazara. There may be a difference in the lives they led, but they became fast friends. Amir would learn to read and Hassan would not. Amir would have the most beautiful toys and particularly kites, and Hassan would be able to help Amir play with the toys and run (fly) his kite. Amir was the spolied son, Hassan was the intelligent and intuitive servant's son. Their lives would intertwine even when separated.
When the Russian army invaded, Amir and his father fled to the United States, California. Amir grew up in a different land, but with the same Afghanistan culture. He and his father became close. Amir married, went to college, all the while wondering what happened to his childhood friend, the one he betrayed.
As time marched on, Amir lost his father to cancer and was summoned to Pakistan to meet with an old family friend. This turns out to be a life renewing event. Amir searches for news of his friend, Hassan. The search takes him back to Afghanistan, to an orphanage, a meeting with a member of the Taliban, a search for his lost city and culture and for a prize he will cherish, for the truth and for the life he regains.
This is a gritty book, the beauty and violence of this country, Afghanistan, comes to life. The customs and food and smells of the city; the desolation of life and the loss of the country to madmen who are running it with only their imagined vulgar needs and wealth in mind that destroys a culture so varied and rich.
We can imagine we are there, and we can share in the sights, the smells, the utter disregard for human life. But we can never know what these people have lost. A book, I will cherish, so will you. prisrob
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No

[Add comment]
Post a comment
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Amazon will display this name with all your submissions, including reviews and discussion posts. (Learn more)
Name:
Badge:
This badge will be assigned to you and will appear along with your name.
There was an error. Please try again.
Please see the full guidelines here.

Official Comment

As a representative of this product you can post one Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
The following name and badge will be shown with this comment:
 (edit name)
After clicking the Post button you will be asked to create your public name, which will be shown with all your contributions.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.  Learn more
Otherwise, you can still post a regular comment on this review.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
 
System timed out

We were unable to verify whether you represent the product. Please try again later, or retry now. Otherwise you can post a regular comment.

Since you previously posted an Official Comment, this comment will appear in the comment section below. You also have the option to edit your Official Comment.   Learn more
The maximum number of Official Comments have been posted. This comment will appear in the comment section below.   Learn more
Prompts for sign-in
 

Comments

Tracked by 2 customers

Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-10 of 14 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Sep 11, 2007 11:05:16 PM PDT
J. Heydecker says:
It's funny. For someone who someone who supposedly read the book, your comments show a political bias that s NOT in the book at all. That "utter disregard for human life" is such a judgmental thing to say. The writer, I would say, has taken great pains to write about the drastic changes of his country in a nearly sterile manner, focusing on the people and their relationships. Your tone and comments like "these people" is so condescending. I'm an American living in Kolkata (Calcutta) and the relationship between son and servant in countries like these is something an American can never understand unless you live here. This relationship is an allegory of larger political issues which are the fundamental cause of so much unrest in this world. His book has a much broader meaning than just Afghanistan. It is a triumph.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 2, 2007 6:17:42 AM PDT
M.L.H says:
By these people I imagine he simply meant the Afghan people. What is condescending in that? I would think the fact that you find it condescending is more telling of your perspective than anyone else's. Although none more so than the fact that you would imply that India equals Afghanistan. Afghanistan is a totally separate country from India with separate ethnicities, language, culture etc. Do you imagine that Europe is the only continent on earth where the people are unique from one nation to the next? It is sad and typical of westerners to lump swaths of unrelated people together due to their lack of education. Let me be the one to inform you that Afghanistan is not India or Iran or Pakistan. It is only Afghanistan.

Posted on Nov 11, 2007 11:46:40 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 11, 2007 5:51:18 PM PST
Me says:
i think the reviewer should re-read the book
catagorizing the two boys as friends is "your" way of defining the relationship
Amir was NOT the "spolied" son {he rather WANTED to be,if you read it correctly}
also Amir,did not "wonder" what happened to his "friend",but rather used a great deal of time escaping from the dread he felt from the connection they had faced

its racist to think that America can "fix" the deep problems shown in this book,the very racism that the book tries to address{you made your review politcal when you said
"How could we be fighting for freedom in this far off land, Afghanistan, and not understand the people; their heritage, their land and what they lost?"

this book is about liars....and racism....self esteem ....universal qualities

what is the truth ?.....duh "happily ever after" seems to be "it" for you ...but now you've read a book about a war zone and you can file your questions away

I suggest you read /see "the secret garden" and try to see any similarities in the two stories
before you lable this "an educating Afgan story'
reviewer you say "This book puts a name and face to the people we are helping to free."....
did the writer also want you to free your mind?

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 8, 2007 7:49:48 PM PST
prisrob says:
Thank you for your comments- The Taliban, as they were described in the book, were the people who had utter disregard for human life. You are projecting, the tone of "these people", I am not condescending at all, those are your terms. And, I would expect many Americans brought up by their nannies or servants would understand exactly the relationship between son and servant. You, sir, are the one with the problem.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 8, 2007 7:50:55 PM PST
prisrob says:
Thank you serial dater, I had not read your comments before I wrote mine, Exactly!

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 8, 2007 7:53:14 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 10, 2007 6:56:52 PM PST
prisrob says:
Thank you for your comments. Your perspective is exactly what you are accusing me of.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 28, 2007 1:38:00 PM PST
Roger Long says:
I agree completely with this comment. And I would add only that a "review" is not a restatement of the plot. Kids in eighth grade do that. This book is a marvelous character study with a surprising word or an unexpected statement in almost every paragraph.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 1, 2008 11:01:01 AM PST
Blessed says:
"Me".. you sound angry and bitter.

Posted on Jan 11, 2008 8:30:50 PM PST
BOY. with the way the review the book... i'm glad i already read the whole thing! you give away everything except the ending in your review. I'd prefer if you would review the book itself and not give us a summary. it makes reading the book pointless. I hate to say it, but i feel like your review is a "spoiler". i'd delete everything except the first and last paragraph our your review (where you give your thoughts on the book).

Posted on Jun 17, 2008 10:59:03 AM PDT
M.L.H says:
Americans are currently acting as invaders and occupiers much as the soviets before them. americans have installed murderous war criminals responsible for years of civil war and terror in their puppet government as they build pipelines to pillage the natural resources of Central Asia and install their uninvited military bases on other people's soil. your remarks about fighting for freedom are an affront to the Afghans that have been murdered since the invasion. please refrain from such rhetoric as it serves no one.
‹ Previous 1 2 Next ›

Review Details

Item

4.5 out of 5 stars (4,259 customer reviews)
5 star:
 (3,072)
4 star:
 (705)
3 star:
 (237)
2 star:
 (144)
1 star:
 (101)
 
 
 
$24.95 $18.38
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Reviewer

prisrob "pris,"
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   

Location: New England USA

Top Reviewer Ranking: 44