Industrial-Sized Deals TextBTS15 Shop Women's Handbags Learn more nav_sap_SWP_6M_fly_beacon Deradoorian $5 Off Fire TV Stick Grocery Shop Popular Services pivdl pivdl pivdl  Amazon Echo Starting at $99 Kindle Voyage Nintendo Digital Games Shop Back to School with Amazon Back to School with Amazon Outdoor Recreation Baby Sale
Customer Review

7 of 12 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Laura Reviews: The Princess Bride, March 28, 2009
This review is from: The Princess Bride: S. Morgenstern's Classic Tale of True Love and High Adventure (Mass Market Paperback)
Very, very, very few movies are better than the book. Having watched The Princess Bride approximately 546 times, I thought it was high time to read the actual book. I thought it was high time to read the actual book. A few years I go, I took the leap and assumed, of course, it would be just as riveting.

It is still inconceivable to me that the book was such a far cry from the magic of the movie. After I finished reading it, I almost cried. No, wait, I actually did cry.

The book and film essentially tell the same storyline. The author writes two stories in one; one tale is a archetypal fairy tale adventure, the other one is a contemporary story of how such timeless fantasies keep us spellbound, no matter our age, location or shoe size.

The Princess Bride has includes so many themes it's hard to keep up, but that's part of the adventure. True Love, Revenge, Giants, Poison, Brave Men, Beautiful Women, Rodents, Torture.

Let me sum up. Princess Buttercup and servant boy Wesley embark upon a true love story. Life circumstances initially draw them apart, yet ultimately they come together in fairy-tale romance style through a series of clever trials and tribulations. Inigo Montoya and Prince Humperdinck excel as supporting antagonist characters, contributing to the witty banter that ensues throughout the movie and film.

Things happen along the way. Miracle Max comes to the rescue to revive Wesley after he is tortured and supposedly dead. Ant then finally, Buttercup and Wesley are reunited because nothing can stop True Love.

Essentially, the plot and themes of the book and movie are the same. What I could not cope with was Goldman's use of the fictional tale of the author. Yes, those parts were italicized, but if I wanted to go from one "scene" to the next, I had to wade through 50 pages just to get there. Major detraction. The only stylistic credit I'll give to Goldman is his masterful use of the run-on sentence.

Come to think of it, I think I'll do a review soon that is a 500-word run-on sentence and see if anyone notices.

No, reading The Princess Bride didn't put me off books forever. It just reminded me that I had to go back to the beginning.

Check out my other reviews at: [...]
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No

[Add comment]
Post a comment
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Amazon will display this name with all your submissions, including reviews and discussion posts. (Learn more)
Name:
Badge:
This badge will be assigned to you and will appear along with your name.
There was an error. Please try again.
Please see the full guidelines here.

Official Comment

As a representative of this product you can post one Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
The following name and badge will be shown with this comment:
 (edit name)
After clicking the Post button you will be asked to create your public name, which will be shown with all your contributions.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.  Learn more
Otherwise, you can still post a regular comment on this review.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
 
System timed out

We were unable to verify whether you represent the product. Please try again later, or retry now. Otherwise you can post a regular comment.

Since you previously posted an Official Comment, this comment will appear in the comment section below. You also have the option to edit your Official Comment.   Learn more
The maximum number of Official Comments have been posted. This comment will appear in the comment section below.   Learn more
Prompts for sign-in
 

Comments

Tracked by 1 customer

Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-3 of 3 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Jun 9, 2009 7:48:41 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 9, 2009 7:48:56 AM PDT
But the film was constantly being interrupted by Columbo and the kid from the Wonder Years, right? If anything, Goldman's original interruptions are better, I think. I also realized, after reading the book, what a good job Goldman and Reiner did with capturing the feel of the book within the film.

I don't see how a lover of the film, and a lover of books, could possibly be disappointed by this.

Posted on Nov 13, 2011 7:49:15 AM PST
Lawrance M. says:
One other example where the movie is superior to the book is "Fight Club" - I was so taken by the movie, I assumed the book would be fantastic. It was a complete and utter let-down. Not only that, the twist at the end of the movie, is given only half-way into the book! Thanks for your take on this. I think I'll save myself the time and effort.

In reply to an earlier post on May 27, 2014 10:04:54 PM PDT
Leslie says:
Yeah, I've noticed people who complain about Goldman's "interruptions" conveniently forget what the movie was really about.

From my perspective, the film is about rediscovering storytelling and seeing family in a different light, while also being a bit of a parody on storytelling in general. The book is a satire on the storytelling process--particularly publishing and screenwriting--but it also has some of those great moments of connecting with family and rediscovering storytelling. I'm not sure why people have this disconnect between the two, but I suspect that many of them have not watched the movie since they were children.
‹ Previous 1 Next ›