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Customer Review

31 of 33 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Worth watching, January 25, 2007
This review is from: National Geographic: The Search For the Battleship Bismarck (DVD)
There are two worth-talking stories of German warships in World War II. One is the Admiral Graf Spee and the other is the Bismarck, pride of the German Navy.

Just like the Titanic, the mighty battleship Bismarck, built secretly, took a one-way ticket in his maiden voyage. Both ships are both found by Dr. Robert Ballard later thanking to modern equipments. The mission of the Bismarck was to blockade the British. After he sank the HMS Hood in a pretty short time, it caused a tremendous shock to the British and the Royal Navy was anxiously trying any way possible to sink him.

The style is similar to the DVD "The Battle of Midway" released by NG. Documentaries, interviews with survivors in that battle, and the progress of searching the sunken Bismarck interweave through this film. The going is smooth without redundancy.

I recommend this film to people who are interested in WW II history and battleships. If you like "The Battle of Midway" and "The Lost Fleet of Guadalcanal", both released by NG, you would like this, too.

It is to my surprise that no one has reviewed this DVD. I think it deserves better and so I wrote the first review of it.
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Showing 1-3 of 3 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Jan 12, 2012 4:32:58 PM PST
JTL says:
All ships are hers, not hims

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 12, 2012 4:40:29 PM PST
I. Chiang says:
True, but Bismarck is the exception from what I know.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 18, 2012 2:56:25 PM PST
JNagarya says:
There is no exception on the point, including Bismark. It's a convention that goes as far back as pre-history. A ship is called "her" and "she" because sailors view it as a substitute for a life on land with a woman. And, as it "cares" for them, a substitute for "mother".
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I. Chiang
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Location: Silicon Valley, CA, USA

Top Reviewer Ranking: 3,900,837