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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the most important books in tech policy in a decade, August 13, 2010
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This review is from: Internet Architecture and Innovation (MIT Press) (Hardcover)
This is an important and brilliant book, which I consider required reading for anyone interested in or serious about the Internet or innovation.

I have written a review of this book on my blog ([...]) and on the Huffington Post.

As I say there, this book is one of the very few books in the field of Internet policy that is in the same league as Larry Lessig's Code: And Other Laws of Cyberspace, Version 2.0, in 2000, and Yochai Benkler's The Wealth of Networks: How Social Production Transforms Markets and Freedom, in 2006, in terms of its originality, depth, and importance to Internet policy and other disciplines. I expect the book to affect how people think about the Internet; about the interactions between law and technical architectures in all areas of law; about entrepreneurship in general. I also think her insights on innovation economics, which strike me as far more persuasive than lawyers' usual assumptions, should influence "law and economics" thinking for the better.

Books this good don't come along every day--or even every year-and I'm already late to the praise-party. Harvard Law professor Larry Lessig (the trail-blazing cyberlaw champion) recommended it in the New York Times this week; Susan Crawford (a law professor who served as a top White House advisor) recommended it in an op-ed in Salon/GigaOm yesterday; Brad Burnham, the venture capitalist who was featured earlier this week in the NYT's Room for Debate, also posted an endorsing review on his blog. MIT engineering professor David Reed (one of the key architects of the IP protocol, inventor of the UDP protocol) praises it on the book jacket.

It is not easy material--the Internet's technologies and how innovation actually evolves--but she writes for a general audience, not a technologist or lawyer, and you will learn a lot from, and be challenged by, the ideas in this book.
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Showing 1-3 of 3 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Aug 16, 2010 8:07:50 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 26, 2010 5:16:45 PM PDT
Reviewer Marvin Ammori says David Reed is the former chief architect of the IP protocol and inventor of the UDP protocol. This is not correct; Ammori seems to be confusing David Reed with David Clark.

UPDATE: Ammori has edited his review to make it less egregiously false, but it's still not correct. No one should assume that this book is endorsed by any of the key engineers who have designed and shepherded the Internet over the many years since its creation in the late 1970s. This is a political activist's book about the Internet, not a factual assessment.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 26, 2010 7:49:51 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Sep 30, 2010 8:16:43 AM PDT
Hi Richard,
I actually do appreciate the points about David Reed, though they're not central to the review, and I think you point out two errors where there is only one.

There are two Davids (Reed and Clark) who were (among other things) co-authors on the original end-to-end paper, but David Clark was chief protocol architect. Nonetheless, Reed was heavily involved in the early design of TCP/IP. http://www.hpl.hp.com/news/2003/july_sept/reed_announce.html
Thanks for pointing that out the mistake there in identifying the great David Reed; I meant to take nothing away from the great David Clark.

But most sources I've seen say Reed designed UDP.
Just google David Reed and UDP and you see dozens of sources claiming Reed designed UDP. In fact, this sentence in common in many those posts: "The protocol was designed by David P. Reed in 1980 and formally defined in RFC 768."

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 26, 2010 11:41:02 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 28, 2010 3:40:03 PM PDT
In Reed's own words:

"A number of people have lately taken to introducing me as "the designer of UDP", or worse "the inventor of UDP." While I'm honored whenever anybody appreciates important design choices where I've been involved, this is not quite right, and it's a little embarrassing to be the inventor of something so simple."

http://www.reed.com/blog-dpr/?page_id=6
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