Customer Review

690 of 742 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Okay at best, August 10, 2013
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This review is from: Becoming a Supple Leopard: The Ultimate Guide to Resolving Pain, Preventing Injury, and Optimizing Athletic Performance (Hardcover)
As a biomechanics and Injury prevention specialist, I specialize in corrective exercise and have made a successful career out of it. I am always looking for new information and books to expand my knowledge of the human body. I was looking for a bit more than what this book provided. I was originally drawn in by the amazing reviews (even before the book was released). Which is awfully suspicious. Regardless, I'd figure I'd see what all of the hype is about. As a practitioner, I am more interested in causation and correction, less in just what looks( or doesn't look) right. This book provided very little of what I was looking for and I'd recommend several other, more detailed books before this one, if you are interested in injury prevention. The book was filled with errors, that was easy for someone like myself to pick out quickly.

Pros: Solid info on 'smashing', picked up some new stuff.

Cons: Lack of detailed explanations
Errors in simple understandings of human mechanics
Heavily influenced by Crossfit propaganda
Little info on causation

Recommendations: NASM Corrective Exercise Specialist
Movement-Gray Cook
Pain-Free Program-Anthony Carey
Advances in Functional Training-Mike Boyle
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Comments

Tracked by 3 customers

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Showing 1-10 of 12 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Feb 28, 2014 9:26:57 AM PST
blair says:
Go meet the author at his Cross Fit Studio in San Francisco where he trains many olympic athletes. Talk to him about your concerns and maybe you and he can get a book more to your liking published together. Thanks for the recommendations. As a full time masseur, preventative is great. BUT rare is the client that comes for preventative. Most people respond to the current. So your interest will have a very small audience. So please, how would you suggest we promote Preventative vs Causitive and make it popular to do? I am very interested since I am always suggesting stuff to clients and giving them LaCrosse balls and I feel it does very little good.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 3, 2014 10:10:50 AM PDT
Art T. says:
Blair I respectfully disagree, but I know we are both sharing anecdotal evidence. Most athletes I know are extremely concerned with injury causation and correction. I definitely want to know how I hurt myself and how to prevent a recurrence .

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 4, 2014 8:45:23 AM PDT
David E Kay says:
Please name one olympic athlete that trains in CrossFit. It is about as far from sport specific as possible.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 7, 2014 9:36:02 PM PDT
PJ says:
Erin Cafaro... Multiple Gold medals.

However, you're right. CrossFit is not sports specific. It also has never claimed to be.

Posted on Apr 24, 2014 6:22:08 PM PDT
R. Goodrich says:
Thanks for the recommendations.

Posted on Jun 14, 2014 2:16:10 AM PDT
it's weird that you're reviewing this book based on what you want rather than what it is. That's like me ordering a chocolate cake and being like, I was really hoping for a cherry pie.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 28, 2014 3:02:18 PM PDT
Anna Tunnicliffe... Gold medalist from Beijing. She just finished 22nd in the Crossfit Games.

Posted on Aug 5, 2014 11:27:56 AM PDT
M. Murphy says:
As someone who's done crossfit and gotten very injured in my lower back and shoulder from pre-packaged WOD's, I found the Movement book by Gray Cook very enlightening as to the info on causation, but that book was very lacking in correctional exercises themselves and dealt primarily with Cook's philosophy regarding exercise and general ways to find causation. Read in tandem with BASL I feel like Movement explains the "why" and provides diagnostics, and BASL provides the "how" of the actual movements to help correct problems. Movement: Functional Movement Systems: Screening, Assessment, Corrective Strategies

Posted on Dec 1, 2014 12:04:49 AM PST
James S. says:
@ Charles: Thank you for your recommendations, I'm always trying to stay in shape in ways that don't injure myself - I'll check out your suggestions :)

Posted on Dec 5, 2014 6:34:56 AM PST
Bill says:
I like the fact that the book was written by a physical therapist. I've found this series helpful, also written by a PT:

http://www.amazon.com/Jim-Johnson/e/B002LPYUBM/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1417789879&sr=8-2-ent
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