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Customer Review

29 of 34 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Realities of War vs. Romantic Rhetoric, January 25, 2000
This review is from: The Face of Battle: A Study of Agincourt, Waterloo, and the Somme (Paperback)
I too found this book is somewhat hard to read (thus the missing 5th star) probably due to the natural language barrier between us Americans and our British cousins.
That said - I really found this book informative and a positive addition to my military book collection. The Face of Battle gives an unbiased view of warfare, separating romantic notions with the bloody facts. A prime example of Keegan's abilities is his critique of General Sir William Naoier's famous "heroic" account, of the 23rd Royal Welch Fusiliers advance against the French in the battle of Albuera in 1811. While the advance of the Fusiliers is an inspirational work in it's own way (ideal for fortifying unit pride or recruiting), it is not fact based nor is it real history. Missing as Keegan points out - are the broken bodies, moments wavering & acts of cowardliness on the part of the Fusiliers.
I'll admit this book is not for everybody as it points out the savageness & realities of warfare. So at no point will you get warm & fussy feelings as you read this book. But for to those of you who want a well-balanced library - I'd highly recommend this book.
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Showing 1-1 of 1 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Aug 3, 2012 9:47:30 AM PDT
Bucherwurm says:
What an interesting - and surprising - thought Mr. Duff i.e. that someone would pick a book on war off of a bookstore shelf hoping to find a book that would give him warm and fuzzy feelings. Mind you, I'm not trying to put you down for that comment; I just find it rather intriguing.

Richard Evans in his book "The Coming of the Third Reich" stated that some German soldiers, including Hitler, were so turned on by the fighting in WWI that they stayed in the army hoping to get more of that great adrenalin rush. Do you suppose Adolf would get that warm and fuzzy feeling reading some of Keegan's books? :-)
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