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112 of 116 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very clear, very well organized and referenced, November 8, 2011
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This review is from: Vitamin K2 and the Calcium Paradox: How a Little-Known Vitamin Could Save Your Life (Paperback)
This book is very well written. It is clear, well organized, and referenced throughly in the back of the book for each chapter. It is written at about the level of Scientific American, easy enough for the intelligent layman to understand. It has particular relevance to anyone on a vegan diet, since most vegans do not eat the only vegan source of Vitamin K2, namely natto (fermented soybeans). For meat eaters, it explains very well the benefits of eating grass fed beef, because vitamin K2 is made in the steer's stomach from the grass.

The blood test for K2 deficiency is indirect, in that it measures the amount of osteocalcin (a protein activated by Vit. K2) that has not be carboxylated (activated). It is called the ucOC test (undercarboxylated osteocalcin) test is not readily available. When it does become available it is very likely that vegans and many meat eaters will be found to be deficient in this vitamin and will suffer the long term consequences, if they do not supplement. One possible consequence of insufficient K2 is stenosis of the aortic valve with calcium. Jack LaLanne had an operation for correction of a stenosed aortic valve (he was a vegan most of his life), and he died shortly thereafter from pneumonia in his weakened condition. Vitamin K2 supplementation might have allowed him to live well past 100.
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Showing 1-4 of 4 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Jan 29, 2012 9:39:39 PM PST
A reader says:
Jack LaLanne was not a vegan most of his life, although it's true that he avoid anything that comes from a cow, including dairy and the cow itself. In an interview he gave at the age of 91, he had the following exchange with interviewer Dennis Hughes of Share Guide (http://www.shareguide.com/LaLanne.html):

Share Guide: In your book you mention that you were a vegetarian at one point for 6 years.
Jack LaLanne: I was a strict vegetarian. Then I decided to enter a Mr. America contest (which I won) and in those days they thought that in order to build muscle you had to have meat. So I ate meat for a while.
Share Guide: Why did you stop being a strict vegetarian?
Jack LaLanne: In those days everybody was saying that you had to eat meat to build muscle, so I went on a meat thing for awhile. Now I only eat fish--no chicken, no turkey, just fish. I get all my protein from fish and egg whites.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 17, 2012 10:59:20 AM PDT
NewYorkGuy says:
Eating only fish and no grass fed meat, cheese, egg yolks or butter would make him deficient in K2, which is the all important point.

Posted on Feb 15, 2013 12:43:07 AM PST
A Customer says:
"Vitamin K2 supplementation might have allowed him to live well past 100."

Could be true, but he did live to 96 anyway, so his diet must have been pretty good overall.

Posted on Feb 27, 2013 8:58:13 PM PST
hapathy says:
96 is a pretty good age. Anyone who wants to critique Jack LaLanne's diet should be older than that age themselves and healthy. Otherwise it amounts to little more than an unrun experiment and a guess that magic this or that nutrient or diet will make you live forever.
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