Customer Review

34 of 34 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Change your life from piles of "stuff"- to sharing on "the Mesh", September 23, 2010
This review is from: The Mesh: Why the Future of Business Is Sharing (Hardcover)
The key idea in this book is that we are changing from owning piles of products (and services) to sharing them and using them only when needed. Out here in San Francisco, where many folks use public transportation for commuting and shopping, few need to own a car. So, there's ZipCar, where you can "own" a car for a few days a month, on a "as needed basis". The author also uses Netflix as an example- but of course we have been renting videos and DVD's for quite some time before that company- there's rarely a need to keep an extensive and expensive video library at home.

As the author says "The Mesh difference is that with GPS-enabled mobile web devices and social networks, physical goods are now easily located in space and time. It has become very convenient to find a ride back from your meeting with someone heading to your neighborhood, or get a great deal for drinks close by, or locate an available home in a home exchange while traveling, or discover a new "popup gallery" near the dinner you're attending."

Other examples of course include the classic "timeshare"- condos. In fact I just stayed at one during a rather nice trip to Disneyworld. It was lovely and worked perfectly for us.

Gansky argues against the modern American "throwaway culture" and shows us that "The Mesh" will bring in more products that are "Durable, flexible, reparable and sustainable." " "When stuff became cheap, and then credit became cheap, we filled our lives with stuff - not the things we really care about. "

This is a fascinating concept and very cutting edge. What I found interesting is that it really sounds so obvious once the author points it out, and I agree we are headed that way more and more.

The book also contains more than 50 pages of "Mesh" businesses and references, and even more at the book's/author webpage.

This is Lisa's first book, she was the founder of several internet companies and is a well known entrepreneur.
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Showing 1-8 of 8 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Sep 23, 2010 3:06:45 PM PDT
Tante Maren says:
Great Review on a fascinating subject! I've noticed since my childhood in the fifties and sixties, as the world became latch key kids and couch potatoes in the 70's and continuing to now, we filled our homes with stuff to occupy our time indoors. In the sixties, we had a Barbie doll and a deck of cards, several books and a jump rope. These things lasted through our entire childhood and later were even passed on to the younger family members. We played out doors daily and walked everywhere. We had a social network of people we spent our day with. Today, with all the parents at work, the children have become shut ins with their stuff. I wish everyone could grow up back in the fifties and sixties when being social means being free, as you can go anywhere with a parent always watching and friends to always be with. It would be so nice if we could have those great times again!

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 23, 2010 4:21:31 PM PDT
Wulfstan says:
Yes, I agree, I like her ideas- except that I still want a couple shelves of my most loved books always at hand.

Posted on Sep 26, 2010 7:22:15 PM PDT
H. Schneider says:
I believe this concept could work in an urban and meshed social environment. (Not for me where I live though, due to obstacles in communications.)

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 26, 2010 9:21:10 PM PDT
Wulfstan says:
You make an excellent point sir, but even out in the rural areas, folks share some things. Farm machinery, for example.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 26, 2010 9:32:41 PM PDT
H. Schneider says:
sure, but the mesh probably needs some density to be really efficient

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 27, 2010 11:13:07 AM PDT
Wulfstan says:
Yes, you're right. Altho certainly some part of this works at rural areas, it's mostly stuff that has always "meshed".

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 28, 2010 6:15:44 AM PDT
In many ways, this concept is quite prevalent in rural areas, such as I live in. The products and services may be different in some cases, but never-the-less there. In our situation we find the sharing concept to be necessary simply because of the non-availability of products and services which `city folk' have unlimited access to. I know in our small town, sharing, etc., and to a great extent bartering of goods rather than buying with cash, is becoming quite common.

And our recent past...the accumulation of stuff; I read a neat way of putting this when an author or commentator called it "The Great American Thing Hunt." Perhaps those days are coming to and end? We shall see.
don

Posted on Sep 30, 2010 4:02:53 PM PDT
This sounds like an interesting, helpful book, WULFY. Lots of new info that I haven't heard of... Thanks xo
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