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75 of 98 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Anecdote heavy & talks down to audience, January 26, 2010
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This review is from: Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness (Paperback)
Nudge mistakenly attempts to make it's simple ideas even simpler so that a popular audience can easily understand them. Unfortunately, Thaler and Sunstein set the bar way too low, and the book is annoyingly dumbed-down. Most educated people know what an externality is: you don't need to put it in quotes. Also, the endless cheekiness and attempts at humor are out of place rather than charming. One would hope that the director of the Office of Information and Regulatory Policy would write a more serious book on his theory of governmental nudging. To the authors: please challenge us with something that we (a diligent audience who wants to know what you really think) can work to understand.

Moreover, the book is structured around different contexts in which the idea of "nudging" can be applied (enviro policy, health policy, financial regulation). This easily turns into an endless stream of "nifty" anecdotes. How about organizing the book on the gradual development and exposition of the concept of governmental "nudging" and its problematics? Keynes sold hard books to a large audience, so did Schlumpeter, so did Darwin. Have people really gotten less intelligent in the last 50 years? I don't think so, but this book makes me think that these academics think so.
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Showing 1-2 of 2 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Mar 31, 2014 5:33:30 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Mar 31, 2014 5:33:45 PM PDT
Have you read "Behavioral Law and Economics" by Sunstein? That might be more in line with what you seek.

In reply to an earlier post on May 7, 2014 12:28:13 AM PDT
Darin Dawdy says:
You sound like you have it all figured out for everyone. Thanks for telling us how we should "understand" the book.

TOYNBEE IDEA IN Kubrik's '2001 RESURRECT DEAD ON PLANET JUPITER.
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