Customer Review

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book by a great thinker, December 19, 2011
This review is from: The End of Christianity: Finding a Good God in an Evil World (Hardcover)
The End of Christianity is William Dembski's attempt to reconcile a good God with the evil that is so inherent in our world. In theological terms, this is called a theodicy. The title refers not to Christianity's demise, but rather to Christianity's ultimate triumph through Jesus.

What Dembski does is remarkable. A mathematician and philosopher who has studied at the University of Chicago, Princeton, and MIT, Dembski introduces a blueprint that is satisfying to the scientific and theological mind.

The premise of The End of Christianity is that there must be a way to reconcile the scientific evidence that suggests the earth is billions of years old and the effects of the Fall as described in the Bible. This obviously involves numerous sciences and philosophical ideas, making Dembski's work a complicated one. There were several chapters that required more than one reading. But the theory the author presents is fascinating.

Dembski proposes that the effects of man's sin in the Garden of Eden, known as the Fall of Man, were retroactive through the natural history of the universe. In other words, the sin of Adam and Eve is responsible for the death of animal and plant life that occurred millions of years before their existence. The idea is radical in one sense, but Christians believe something similar. It is a widely held Christian belief that the death of Jesus provided retroactive salvation for those who lived before his death.

Dembski provides thorough explanation for his theory, and the book, while technically complex, is a great read. I highly recommend it for anyone who is struggling with the concept of science and faith.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No

[Add comment]
Post a comment
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Amazon will display this name with all your submissions, including reviews and discussion posts. (Learn more)
Name:
Badge:
This badge will be assigned to you and will appear along with your name.
There was an error. Please try again.
Please see the full guidelines here.

Official Comment

As a representative of this product you can post one Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
The following name and badge will be shown with this comment:
 (edit name)
After clicking the Post button you will be asked to create your public name, which will be shown with all your contributions.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.  Learn more
Otherwise, you can still post a regular comment on this review.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
 
System timed out

We were unable to verify whether you represent the product. Please try again later, or retry now. Otherwise you can post a regular comment.

Since you previously posted an Official Comment, this comment will appear in the comment section below. You also have the option to edit your Official Comment.   Learn more
The maximum number of Official Comments have been posted. This comment will appear in the comment section below.   Learn more
Prompts for sign-in
 

Comments


Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-1 of 1 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Oct 15, 2013 5:38:14 AM PDT
Anonymous says:
"What Dembski does is remarkable."

Yes. It's worth "remarking" that he does violence to "causality". But, of course, when someone is trying to explain the impossible, it's pretty hard to avoid violating the fundamental law of "causality".

"Dembski proposes that the effects of man's sin in the Garden of Eden, known as the Fall of Man, were retroactive through the natural history of the universe."

That someone would waste time writing a book about something so ridiculous seems unbelievable. But then again, he is writing about a book that is unbelievable.
‹ Previous 1 Next ›

Review Details

Item

Reviewer


Location: Texas

Top Reviewer Ranking: 50,572