Customer Review

21 of 23 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great idea, but USB ports are not high powered, May 18, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Belkin 6-Outlet Wall Mount Surge Protector with Dual USB Ports (1 AMP / 5 Watt) (Electronics)
I bought this specifically to charge my iPhone 4S on my bedside table at night with surge protection, and without clogging up the extra plugs which I need for my lamp, fan and laptop. I figured it might come in handy for my wife's iPad 2 as well.

It works OK, but takes some time to charge the iPad (longer than the charger that it came with anyway). Looking at the Belkin packaging, in some small print at the back it says the USB ports are 5V and 750mA. From what I researched online for Apple's OEM chargers that come with their devices, the 10W iPad charger is 5V at 2.1A, and the 5W iPhone charger is 5V at 1A.

I just wish it were able to run at the same capacity as the OEM chargers to easily and quickly charge both devices in the same time as the OEM chargers.

In case anyone else is interested in knowing before buying (I would be), the Technical Specifications as listed on the packaging are as follows:

Continuous Duty Electrical Rating
125V/15A/60Hz/1875W

Maximum Energy Dissipation: 900 Joules
H-N: 300 Joules
H-G: 300 Joules
N-G: 300 Joules

Maximum Spike Current: 30,000A
H-N: 10,000A
H-G: 10,000A
N-G: 10,000A

UL Clamping Voltage (3-Line): UL 1449 500V

Response Time: <1 Nanosecond

EMI/RFI Noise Filtration:
150KHz~100MHz up to 43 dB Reduction

Powered USB Output:
5W/750mA each port

***EDIT***
Review changed from 3 to 4 stars - see my response to the comment dated June 4, 2012 below.
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Comments

Tracked by 4 customers

Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-10 of 10 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Jun 4, 2012 3:23:48 AM PDT
SBJ400 says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 4, 2012 10:05:46 AM PDT
dredman1 says:
In retrospect, I agree with you. It is unreasonable to assume this would charge ALL devices as their OEM chargers would.

Thus I've changed the rating from 3 to 4 stars.

However, I still took off 1 star since the product information didn't indicate the possible issues with charging devices which require higher USB amperage than what this product provides. The manufacturer should have been at least more forthcoming with that information.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 4, 2012 10:33:06 AM PDT
jojo says:
"because so many of the smaller devices like MP3 players, cell phones, etc would cook if exposed to anything higher" <--- Not sure I understood what you are implying. You can safely connect devices like mp3 players that need only 500mA to a charger that can provide 2A - the device will just pull the current (power) that it needs.
It would have been good if this outlet could provide 1A (2A if possible) and that way, it would permit a majority of the devices to be charged from it.
At the very minimum, the description should state the current (power) that this outlet can provide.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 11, 2012 7:29:39 AM PDT
doctor don says:
Nothing cooks just because the available current is greater than what the device will actually use. If that were true ('cooking'), most appliances would already be dead when first plugged into an AC outlet since most residential load centers usually provide a minimum of 100 amperes.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 16, 2012 10:44:47 AM PST
mbs says:
Isn't this why most electronics come with a power adapter for plugging into an AC outlet? Most don't plug directly into the wall outlet like a lamp or something. As far as I know, (which isn't very far) a USB cable doesn't have an adapter to step down voltage and amperage to the proper levels for its device.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 16, 2012 2:01:10 PM PST
doctor don says:
Most electronics come with AC adapters if the devices require DC current and / or fewer than 110-120 volts AC. Many of the devices that use an AC adapter into which a USB cable is plugged will require 5 volts, the same as provided by the USB ports of most computers.

The problem with some adapters is that they do not provide the amount of current required to charge electronic devices in the time stated in the specifications. If possible, I would like to have adapters that are capable of 1,000 mA. If my device does not need 1,000 mA, then it will not draw that much current. However, my phone and iPad do require 1,000 mA to charge in a reasonable amount of time.

Posted on Jan 21, 2013 10:38:55 PM PST
Mikey says:
Thank you for providing this information "UL Clamping Voltage (3-Line): UL 1449 500V". That is the most important information when considering surge suppressors and it tells me that on a 120V circuit this is completely USELESS as a surge suppressor. The maximum clamping voltage on a 120VAC circuit should be 330V any higher and the devices will fry long before the surge suppressor does anything. The Joule rating is the second most important piece of information but if the clamping voltage is too high than even if it could absorb an infinite number of Joules it would still be useless.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 22, 2013 7:30:56 AM PST
dredman1 says:
Thanks Mikey for clarifying that.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 29, 2013 2:13:13 PM PDT
Slim says:
Let me see if I understand this information correctly, are you guys saying that this device is in fact useless as a surge protector?

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 29, 2013 3:15:35 PM PDT
doctor don says:
Don't you think the Belkin company would be bankrupt if the clamping voltage were too high - as suggested by Mikey - since they warrant devices plugged into their outlet for $25,000?

New technology, high quality surge suppressors can now clamp voltage at 130 V, and that is much better than even the 330 V mentioned by Mikey. However, lower clamping voltages can result in protection devices having shorter lives. I prefer those devices that have a replaceable fuse that blows to protect my electronics.
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Location: Trinidad & Tobago

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