Customer Review

157 of 192 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Learn about the ND filters before you buy one., April 22, 2010
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This review is from: Tiffen 72mm Neutral Density 0.9 Filter (Electronics)
If you think this is the strongest ND filter you can get, then it is wrong. DO NOT BUY THIS. This is only 3-stop and there are 9 or 10 stop filters available. Learn about ND filters before settling on one.

With this ND filter, you cannot take pictures of water falls in bright day light (even with smallest aperture (F22)). But if you want to take the same later in the day (around sunset), this will help you a lot. I took lots of pictures using this filter during my trip to Yosemite. I could take really nice waterfall motion (with 1 sec exposure during sunset) but all the pictures I took during day time were washed out...they all became too bright.

If you have a polarizing filter, you may stack on top of it (be careful with vignetting) to get more darkness.

The filter itself is very well built and I was able to easily screw/unscrew from the lens. I would put some more money to get more f-stop. I will post some sample pics I took soon.
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Showing 1-10 of 10 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Oct 23, 2010 7:12:22 AM PDT
They do make an ND filter in a 1.2 grade which is 4 stops. You can combine a ND 0.3 with the 1.2 and get five stops if you wish, etc. I'm into cinematography so I use them primarily for depth of field purposes, to lower the contrast between light and shadow areas and also to get the desired f stop I'm looking for in a shot. They are invaluable.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 16, 2011 2:23:16 PM PST
Serg says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 24, 2012 12:23:52 PM PDT
Ran Kravania says:
Actually you can get a 6 grade and drop 20 stops. Basically every 0.3 increase drops 1 F-stop although at higher values it's a little more.

0.3 - 1 f-stop
0.6 - 2 f-stops
0.9 - 3 f-stops

(intermediate range)

3 - 10 f-stops
4 - 13 f-stops
6 - 20 f-stops

Posted on Jun 3, 2013 3:52:02 PM PDT
I'm not sure why you'd use a 58mm ND filter for landscape photography, as most wide angle lenses require a 77mm or 82mm filter. This filter is ideal for portraiture in bright light, or studio settings, where you want shallow depth of field without blowing out the highlights of an image. Your advice is correct, but not necessarily warranted.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 7, 2013 9:15:24 AM PDT
Disco says:
Define "wide angle." I'm guessing a lot of people who want this filter don't have anything much wider than 18mm.

Posted on Sep 17, 2013 12:30:30 AM PDT
Robin says:
Please stick to reviewing the filter rather than impressing everyone with your lack of photographic knowledge. A 10 stop filter is a solar filter having nothing to do with waterfalls. A 3-stop .9 ND on top of the f22 you mention is an f45. It would be instructive to learn what ISO and shutter you used to get an over-exposure of a waterfall. Rather than uninformed rants, take a basic photography course where they will teach you about ISO/shutter control and find how truly rare a need beyond .6 or .9 actually is.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 27, 2013 9:15:50 PM PDT
shopper22 says:
I was just wondering about that myself...how the waterfall can be overexposed. Maybe the water is not as creamy/blurry but overexposed seems a bit reaching.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 3, 2013 8:30:33 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 3, 2013 8:31:28 PM PST
Anil Bakshi says:
Thank you Robin!!. You spoke facts here & a gentle Robin decimated a Hawk.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 16, 2014 10:29:11 PM PDT
Maybe because not everybody invests in expensive wide angle lenses and are doing the best they can with their kit lenses that happen to take 58mm filters. And BTW, the Canon EF-S 10-18mm only takes 67mm and that certainly qualifies as wide angle.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 16, 2014 10:32:34 PM PDT
Seriously? Get off your pedestal. The OP is only saying that you shouldn't expect to get much motion blur in full daylight. It's they're opinion. It's that condescending attitude of yours that gives photographers a bad name.
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