Customer Review

89 of 114 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I love this book, August 18, 2008
This review is from: The Predator State: How Conservatives Abandoned the Free Market and Why Liberals Should Too (Hardcover)
Searing insights into neoclassical economics (the academic standard),past conservative economic policies, and liberal acquiesence to the conservative mantra of free markets. This book is a must (so are all good commentaries)even for those that profess ignorance of economics in companionship with McCain. If you want to know why the U. S. is terribly awry and needs attention and sweat and great effort to come about to some semblance of normalcy but you didn't have the metaphors or knowledge to tackle the contortions of the past and present, read this even if you are not an economist. This is about the enslavement of our government to the will of the wealthy and the corporations and how and what can be done.
Most who pay attention know this, but do they understand it quite as well as elucidated by this great economist?

An long ago graduate in economics,and, institutional economist from, U. of Texas,Austin
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Tracked by 2 customers

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Showing 1-6 of 6 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Oct 25, 2008 11:04:37 AM PDT
R. Bono says:
I'm a big supporter of J. K. Galbraith's liberal ideas for many years. A state which has a free-market, laizzez faire ideology as its driving idea....is a state that has left the wolf into the hen house! I look forward to a great read. Thanks.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 6, 2009 8:40:22 AM PST
John says:
And yet why is it that the most free market economies in our world (Switzerland, Hong Kong before it was swallowed by China, Singapore) are so successful, and raise the living standards of everyone, and that the least free market economies (North Korea, Cuba, etc.) are so horrible ? And if those are the extreme forms of the free market and of socialism, maybe the less intense forms also lead in the direction either of dynamism and wealth (the free market), or stagnation and repression (socialism).

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 10, 2009 3:26:24 PM PST
AL says:
I guess you didnt read the book, idiot.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 21, 2009 11:32:01 AM PDT
J.T. Davis says:
In reply to an earlier post on Feb 6, 2009 8:40 AM PST
"John says:
And yet why is it that the most free market economies in our world (Switzerland...)"

John is truly a clueless moron. Switzeland, probably the most conservative democracy on the planet (women only got the vote in 1971 or 2) has had what this pinhead would call "socialized" health care for years now. Obviously too stupid to comprehend 90 per cent of what he reads.

Posted on Mar 27, 2010 1:10:40 AM PDT
Amy Masarwe says:
Wait a cotton pickin'.. I know you! Busted! lol that's hilarious

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 11, 2010 11:51:41 PM PDT
BruceK says:
John, you should not get jumped on for asking a question ... except that your question is more of a backhanded challenge, without knowing that the book is about first.

So ... read the book. A free market does not have to be laizzez faire and it is a very delicate thing, after all I think there is a tendency over time for the winners to take the game into a corrupt mode.

North Korea and Cuba are not that hard to figure out. Both have had terrible governments, and total corruption.

I heard a study that said what was really needed for economic growth and development was predictability, infrastructure and the rule of law. Not hard to understand Switzerland, Hong Kong, Singapore. China is a bit more difficult.

This book goes into China a little bit, and China is a real mysterious melange of all kinds of ideas.

The other book I am going to recommend is Ha-Joon Chang's "Bad Samaritans" which talks at some length about South Korea, which had huge growth and raised the living standard of their people by about 8 times in 20 years while being run my a benevolent military dictatorship.

Pointing to a lot of complex other places and asking spurious questions is one way to waste time I suppose, but the real question is what are the changes in America, how did they come about, and how can we fix them. Honestly, I thought this was a good book but I did not feel I got any answers in it.
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