Customer Review

40 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Reveiw of Red Planet, June 29, 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Red Planet (A Del Rey book) (Mass Market Paperback)
When I was in fourth grade, a few years ago(I'm 11, just out of sixth grade), one of my freinds told me I should read Starship Troopers. I loved it so much that I looked for as many other books as I could find. A few I didn't read, because they looked like romance. The others, including Red Planet, I read. Red Planet was my favorite. It was so good, I read it in two days.(Mind you I was in fourth grade)I loved the Willis so much, everything on the web(e-mail,web page, etc.) that is mine, is named after him. You'll love the book. The best I've ever read.
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Showing 1-4 of 4 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Nov 17, 2009 6:04:05 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 17, 2009 6:04:45 AM PST
I think you nailed it, in that Heinlein wrote (at least) two very different kinds of fiction - his "juveniles" like Red Planet, Tunnel in the sky, Citizen of the Galaxy, StarShip Troopers, maybe Orphans of the sky, Spaceman Jones, and so, and his heavier work starting with "Stranger in a Strange land", then including things like "Time enough for love", "Friday", "Job: A Comedy of Justice", etc.

Personally, I prefer Henlein's earlier works as well. My advice is to find an adult who is a R.A.H fan and ask advice - or just read the first ten pages at the library before you buy them - or check the original copyright date. Henlein published "Stranger in a strange land" in 1962, and began exploring adult themes after that.

If you want to stick to high fantasy - right makes right, the good guys win -- all while exploring deep issues in philosophy of justice - I'd advise you to stick to book written before 1962.

In reply to an earlier post on May 24, 2012 7:06:32 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 24, 2012 11:27:27 AM PDT
You forget a third basic category of Heinlein's work: the even earlier stuff, mostly from the 1940's I think, that eventually became the "Future History". Lots of great short stories, collected in volumes such as "The Green Hills of Earth" and "The Menace from Earth" (the title* of the latter is a clear precursor of his juvenile novels). Though much of this material is accessible to young readers, the intended audience is adult.

*ETA "title STORY"

In reply to an earlier post on May 24, 2012 9:51:53 AM PDT
IIRC, /all/ of the future history stuff is collected into one book "The past through tomorrow" The Past Through Tomorrow: Future History Stories - I agree that the reading level of that is higher than his juveniles. Lazarus Long makes an appearance and I believe some of the material is a little adult - but you see slightly adult things in Revolt in 2100, etc, set in that universe.

I think it's fair to say that "future history" is intended for a more adult audience - not that is has adult themes as much as a higher reading level, than, say, the "boys life" serials that became starman jones.

Overall, I agree, thinking of three modes of his writing is helpful. If we dug deeper, I'm sure we'd find more. :-)

In reply to an earlier post on May 24, 2012 11:32:40 AM PDT
Of course a certain amount of the post-Stranger work is kind of an attempt to bring everything into a kind of meta-"Future History". Oddly, I feel very little inclination to re-read these later books.

Then there is stuff that's not really in any of the categories -- Magic, Inc., (Waldo might be Future History) and Glory Road, for instance. I don't think The Puppet Masters was part of the original Future History, though I think he tried to tie it into the "uber-History".
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