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Customer Review

25 of 28 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Agony & Ecstasy, July 4, 2013
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This review is from: Rebuilt: Awakening the Faithful, Reaching the Lost, and Making Church Matter (Paperback)
Like another reviewer, I am a DRE, so was/am keenly interested in learning the authors' approach to the new evangelization. And like the other DRE reviewer, I find myself shouting "YES!" at some parts. However, I have a concern about the way the parishioners who were in place when the pastor and youth minister arrived are characterized, esp since that parish is identified--really? If the cantor's musical ability, or lack thereof, was going to be so pointedly described, could you have made the parish anonymous? etc. The book is definitely "Forming Intentional Disciples-light". Some very good points, and an easy read. But again, the lack of charity and a somewhat smug tone gives me heartburn.
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Showing 1-2 of 2 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Oct 10, 2013 2:33:20 PM PDT
I am part way through this book, and I have some of the same concerns. Anyone who writes publicly knows that those who are published have an unfair advantage over others who are not, and the better person is the one who doesn't take advantage of that. To the degree this book is used as a platform to throw so many of the earlier parishioners "under the bus" it's objectionable.

If anyone has similar notions regarding "rebuilding" a parish and needs guidelines how to marginalize others who don't share that same vision, he'll find it "Rebuilt."

Example: Is the belittling characterization of these former parishioners as "consumers," who see their parish as a type of store, fair? It's more likely they viewed their parish as an extension of "family" and "home." Of course, anytime you turn family life upside down, people will feel disoriented and threatened. Yes, the authors give the requisite nod to their own shortcomings in handling the transition, but they spend far more time describing their own hurt feelings and pointing out the shortcomings of those who did not see eye to eye with them.

There's a self-serving quality to such comments that will cause me to read the rest of the book with more than a grain of salt.

And making other people identifiable to those "in the know" - such as the cantor - is truly unconscionable.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 8, 2014 6:09:01 PM PST
amdg says:
In my personal experience with Nativity there is much bustle and hustle and noise and sociability and camaraderie and little to no emphasis on Jesus Christ. I wrote a poem once called "God in a Box Ignored." That is Nativity. He is not The Way there, He is in the way. The faithful should be forewarned.
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