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Customer Review

105 of 118 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Statue of Liberty in hardcover!, April 24, 2012
This review is from: Still the Best Hope: Why the World Needs American Values to Triumph (Hardcover)
Still the Best Hope, is the Statue of Liberty in hardcover. No other book combines such sharp insights into America's current state. No other book is at once so deep and so sensible, so succinct and so comprehensive, so American and so universal. In this extraordinary book, Dennis Prager, argues that the global social and political crisis of the 21st century is really an intellectual crisis. That is, a battle of ideas between American values and their alternatives. There is nothing partisan or one-sided about his argument. He makes his case fairly, lucidly, and persuasively. His book moves with a kind of worried grace probing the difference between liberal and conservative thought, and he has something urgent to teach the people on either side. Prager's sweeping analysis is a grand tour of American values. And the power these values have to light a torch of hope and liberty in a dark world.
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Tracked by 2 customers

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Showing 1-7 of 7 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Apr 24, 2012 8:15:33 PM PDT
Bartleby says:
There is nothing partisan? Being very familiar with Prager, I am skeptical.

Posted on Jun 1, 2012 9:14:22 PM PDT
David D says:
You have not even read this book, have you Bartley?

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 24, 2012 1:40:19 PM PDT
Joe Campese says:
@ Bartleby...Funny. People like you say foolish things like that, and rarely if ever give examples. Why is that?

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 1, 2012 10:36:52 AM PDT
Ian Zeggman says:
Perhaps it's because the whole book is making the case that one philosophy is superior to two others, which makes its partisan viewpoint explicit.

I doubt that Dennis Prager would deny that his book is partisan, but his fans for some reason think that every criticism (even, as here, a criticism of a claim made by a reviewer) must be downvoted and backtalked. I'm sure in a week this comment will be "3 of 7 people think this post adds to the discussion" (or worse) too.

The question isn't so much whether the book is partisan, it clearly is. The question should be, does Mr. Prager make a convincing case. On that, I think the evidence is mixed. Some of the things he thinks are silly really are silly, and those claims almost stand on their own. Others, like his tortured attempt to make belief in "the god of ethical monotheism" an essential part of American values, are really not well supported.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 11, 2012 8:59:59 AM PDT
Ian, partisan means "a strong supporter of a party, cause, or person." Prager certainly is no fan of Big-R Republicans (especially inside-the-beltway), and he doesn't champion any one man. He doesn't even support a "cause" in the sense of a special interest, rather he supports the philosophies of liberty and free markets, which are certainly not "causes."

I up-voted your comment, since it certainly adds to the discussion. :-)

Posted on Jan 3, 2013 10:24:09 AM PST
nice!

Posted on Aug 25, 2013 2:29:27 PM PDT
Eric Gudorf says:
"In this extraordinary book, Dennis Prager, argues that the global social and political crisis of the 21st century is really an intellectual crisis. "

While I listen to Prager regularly, I think the above is dead wrong. It is not an "Intellectual" crisis, but a moral crisis. And thus Prager makes the mistake of trying to beat his enemies on intellectual grounds, trying to win over people's minds rather than their hearts. Which never works, since left wingers are already convinved they are morally superior and no amount of "Intellectual" argument is going to convince them otherwise.
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