Customer Review

144 of 150 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars under-powered for modern smartphones, November 19, 2012
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This review is from: OEM Motorola SPN5689A Dual Port Universal Wall Charger for Motorola Droid RAZR MAXX XT916 / XT913, Admiral / PAX XT603, Atrix 2, DROID RAZR XT912 /HD, Photon 4G, Triumph WX435, Theory WX430, Titanium i1x, i412, XPRT, Droid X2, Clutch + i475 (Wireless Phone Accessory)
Curious that the product description does not tell you the power output specification for this charger. The reason is that the printing on the device says 750mA, presumably split between the 2 USB ports. Compare that to a modern smartphone charger that is at least 1000mA for only one port. This Motorola charger will charge your phone eventually, but really really slowly. That maybe OK if you can let it charge all night (at least 8 hours). Don't bother if you need a fast charge at an airport or coffee shop. And don't even think of using this with a tablet. Tablet chargers are usually 2000mA or more and those still take a while to charge up.
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Tracked by 2 customers

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Showing 1-6 of 6 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Nov 30, 2012 12:16:27 AM PST
Every modern device I have includes a charger capable of charging from <20% to >90% in 2 hours or less.
My Android phone charger is 700mA and the phone hit stores November 2011.
My Bluetooth headset charger is 180mA.
My Android tablet charger is 2.1A (2100mA).
I intentionally charge on lower power chargers when available to be gentile on my batteries, especially when charging a device overnight which seems the best time to charge if you ask me... I have to charge my Bluetooth on the Bluetooth charger because I can't find a lower power charger, but I also charge my phone on the Bluetooth charger, and charge my tablet on my phone charger whenever time allows. I will plug my tablet in to it's OE 2.1A charger if I REALLY need to charge it FAST, but I hate doing that. The batteries get hot and I feel like I just took a week off the life of the battery every time I use the OE charger on a device.
Thanks for the review, but I'm looking for a 500mA or under charger

Posted on Dec 12, 2012 4:36:26 PM PST
My new razr maxx came with a charger identical to this and it charges my phone just fine.

Posted on Jan 6, 2013 9:34:37 AM PST
Brother Mark says:
I2 is right. Most new android smartphones draw 1 amp and most apple devices draw 2 amps. This charger will not charge as fast as many OEM chargers, or even many of the after market chargers that split 3 amps between the two usb ports. It may work, just not very fast.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 1, 2014 4:29:38 PM PDT
RC says:
Phones and tablets are smart enough to be able to select between the USB standard 500mA, and higher power modes, but YOUR BLUETOOTH HEADSET IS NOT. You can plug it into a 8000mA tablet charger, and it'll draw the same 180mA from it that it would any other charger.

I would also bet that your phone draws the full 500mA from your 180mA rated bluetooth charger, possibly causing the charger to overheat and fail. Phones/tablets use simple tricks like measuring the resistance between the two data pins to detect the difference between standard 500mA USB ports, and dedicated fast wall chargers. It's got no way to know about being connected to a 180mA, and the abuse to the charger runs the risk of causing a fire.

While very fast charging can shorten the life of your battery, it's NOT true that ultra-slow charging will make it last longer...

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 11, 2014 11:22:45 PM PST
"Phones and tablets are smart enough to be able to select between the USB standard 500mA, and higher power modes, but YOUR BLUETOOTH HEADSET IS NOT. You can plug it into a 8000mA tablet charger, and it'll draw the same 180mA from it that it would any other charger. "

The manual for my Bluetooth specifically warns against using any charger other than the factory supplied 180mA charger. I'll default to the manufacturer recommendation for this.

"I would also bet that your phone draws the full 500mA from your 180mA rated bluetooth charger, possibly causing the charger to overheat and fail. Phones/tablets use simple tricks like measuring the resistance between the two data pins to detect the difference between standard 500mA USB ports, and dedicated fast wall chargers. It's got no way to know about being connected to a 180mA, and the abuse to the charger runs the risk of causing a fire."

I doubt it. My phone charges significantly slower on the 180mA Bluetooth charger than it does when plugged in to any other charging source. If I forget to plug my phone in at night and wake to dying battery beeps I don't plug into the Bluetooth charger because I'll have 20-25% charge by the time I need to leave the house; I plug in to the factory charger because I will have over 90% charge by the time I need to leave. Current limiting is very cheap and easy to do but it does require components which equal size and weight. With a cheap dumb Bluetooth I'm guessing they spent the money on current limiting the charger rather than add unnecessary weight and circuitry needed for current limiting within the Bluetooth ear piece.

"While very fast charging can shorten the life of your battery, it's NOT true that ultra-slow charging will make it last longer..."

Uh, so we're in agreement here. I never said I was going to make my 5 year battery last 30 years by ultra slow charging, my goal is to get 5 years out of my 5 year battery by avoiding unnecessary ultra fast charges that could shorten battery life to 2 or 3 years.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 12, 2014 1:50:20 PM PST
RC says:
Every device ever made with a detachable charger, similarly "specifically warns against using any charger other than the factory supplied". It's standard legal boiler-plate so they aren't responsible when you hook it up to something totally unsuitable. No doubt your phone has the same warning in the fine-print, which you are ignoring when you overload your bluetooth charger.

Similarly, I don't see why you trust your bluetooth manufacturer implicitly, only to turn around and say your cell phone manufacturer sold the device with an included charger that's going to HALVE the battery life, completely unnecessarily... It seems like a very strange, very inconsistent selective method.
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