Customer Review

163 of 178 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Save the best for first..., August 17, 2000
This review is from: Led Zeppelin 1 (Audio CD)
This is Led Zeppelin's best CD. No other CD truly defines this band better than their self-titled debut. All songs on this album are indispensible. Dazed and Confused is a masterpiece, as is Babe, I'm Gonna Leave you. But the real heart and soul of this record are its blues tracks You Shook Me and I Can't Quit You Baby anchor the album. Zep was always at their best playing the blues, just check out Since I've Been Lovin' You. Your Time is Gonna Come still gives me goosebumps, and How Many More Times is the hidden gem on the album. Zeppelin would never top the overall consistency of this album, it is a true landmark in rock history and should be in every fans' collection.
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Tracked by 4 customers

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Showing 1-10 of 23 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Oct 27, 2006 3:29:42 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 27, 2006 5:53:07 PM PDT
Drew says:
I agree with you 100%. And I'd add that, if ever a recording deserved to be called the devil's music, this is it. This is the ultimate, take-no-prisoners soundtrack from Hell.

Posted on Dec 19, 2006 5:05:19 PM PST
S. Sebastian says:
i disagree. i feel that II and IV are both much better albums than the debut. however, i still enjoy this album a lot.

Posted on Jan 9, 2007 11:00:36 AM PST
M. Maxwell says:
This is Zep's best, when the band was still fresh and creative and Robert Plant still sounded like a man.

One of only a few select albums that have made me laugh out loud at how awesome these guys are.

Posted on Feb 2, 2007 8:40:02 PM PST
finulanu says:
"it is a true landmark in rock history"
I don't know about that... this is essentially Truth, only with much longer songs and a slight Traffic influence. Jeff Beck + Traffic = Led Zeppelin. They were a decent little rock band, and had quite a few good songs, but their "influence" is just ripping off what groups like the aforementioned Jeff Beck Group; Cream and Jimi Hendrix had been doing in the '67-'68 timeframe. Jimmy Page is awesome, don't get me wrong, but he wouldn't have gotten anywhere without Jeff Beck.

Posted on Mar 13, 2007 3:07:09 AM PDT
poxy1 says:
I'm sorry Drew, but this album is not the ultimate, take-no-prisoners soundtrack from Hell, as you put it. That title belongs to one album, and one album only above all others in in the history of rock. I'll let you guess which album it is, but I'll only say it is by a little group called The Stooges. Ah heck, it's Funhouse. But I'll forgive you if you haven't heard it ;)

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 21, 2007 10:25:37 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 21, 2007 10:25:50 PM PDT
finulanu says:
I agree. That album kicks some serious keister. Much more than this one does, at least. Fun House easily makes my Top Ten favorite albums.

In reply to an earlier post on May 16, 2009 10:02:17 PM PDT
I think that you are dead wrong about Page getting nowhere without Beck. First off, Page was the most utilized session man in England before his time with the Yardbirds. Second, Page was recorded with Clapton in some early blues tracts that have shown up as a collection under several titles, the first being "An Anthology of British Blues" - 1966, being an even earlier recording. Beck is featured with his earlier band The Tridents, but was clearly behind Page. Third, Page had his own unique style that was sure to find its way to greatness without having ever been with the Yardbirds or associated in a band with Jeff Beck. I like Beck a great deal, but this statement of yours is completely erroneous. As for bands "ripping off" bands; it all happened so fast that no one can be accused of that, especiall since they were all "ripping off" earlier Black Bluesmen. None of them were actually originals, but it was their interpretations that gave the old blues numbers new energy. A bit of research will show that Page was already shaping songs like "Dazed and Confused" while in the Yardbirds and "Happenings Ten Years Time Ago"Certainly, was a Page riff that is thought of as the first true psychedelic rock music - at least a Year before the Hendrix debut. Led Zeppelin took blues interpretation to a new and astonishing level. They topped everyone in that time. I was there and everyone knew this.... Led Zeppelin was THE acknowledged LAST WORD in the 1960s Blues Revival. Today, people often look backwards with fading memory or simply a retrospective disattached from the actual period.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 13, 2010 8:29:56 PM PDT
B. G. Ball says:
I disagree, Led Zeppelin's Physical Graffiti tops this album. Go ahead, you can say this is Led Zeppelin's most original album, but who cares. "Down by the seaside," "Kasmir," "In the light," "Custard pie" and the rest are timeless classics.

People really need to indulge in Led Zeppelin's other stuff, the only reason the other Led Zeppelin albums (II, III, and the fourth) are popular is the fact that everyone knows that what follows after 1 is 2 then 3, and then 4.

I think Led Zeppelin's best representation its brillance as a band is "Physical Graffiti."

In reply to an earlier post on May 24, 2010 8:41:09 PM PDT
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

Posted on Nov 30, 2010 4:55:41 PM PST
Led Zeppelin ripped off the music and song title of "Dazed and Confused" from an American folk singer named Jake Holmes. If you listen to the Jake Holmes version, the music is essentialy the same riffs, specifically the bass line, except Zepplelin's version is Blues/HardRock and the Holmes version is Folk/Acoustic. Zeppelin also changed the lyrics.

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