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Customer Review

7 of 14 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Beware of ordering the 1992 edition!, May 1, 2012
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This review is from: The Most Instructive Games of Chess Ever Played: 62 Masterpieces of Chess Strategy (Paperback)
I ordered this book based upon the rapturous reviews. No one seemed to notice or care if the book was non-algebraic. Well it is the 1965 book without any updates. Since I saw 1992 in the description of this edition I thought it would be safe to buy and not get the old notation. Sorry Charlie! Dover re-issued the 1965 book AS IS. It has been an interesting excercise, no doubt, trying to follow these games when the notation is, for example, 1. P-Q4 P-Q4 2. P-QB4 P-QB3 3. Kt-QB3 Kt-B3 4. B-Kt5 P-K3....etc....And those are just the easy ones. Caveat Emptor!
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Showing 1-3 of 3 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Nov 1, 2013 8:06:47 AM PDT
Black's moves are merely recorded from black's view of the board. With a little practice it should become much easier. Indeed, the conversion to algebraic notation is lonnnng overdue. But, as is, it's still well worth the effort.

Posted on Aug 22, 2015 4:14:56 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 22, 2015 4:19:45 AM PDT
Although the games are described using descriptive notation (1. P-K4 P-K4 2. N-KB3 N-QB3 3. B-N5 P-QR3) instead of algebraic notation (1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6) that should not matter. Both systems for recording chess moves are easy to use and simple to learn. Each system describes the piece being moved and the square that that piece is being moved to. When you use descriptive notation each file is named after the piece that was "originally" on that square at the start of the game: R, N, B, Q, K, B, N, R (since there are two rook (R) files, two knight (N) files, and two bishop (B) files, you distinguish between them by noting the side of the board that they are on, i.e., the queenside or the kingside: QR, QN, QB, Q, K, KB, KN, KR).

White records his moves from his perspective and Black records his moves from his perspective, so 1. P-K4 states that the pawn moves to the 4th square (from White's perspective) in front of the king file. 1. ... P-K4 states that the pawn moves to the 4th square (from Black's perspective); 2. N-KB3 states that the knight (N) moves to the square on the third rank (from White's perspective) on the bishop (B) file on the king's (K) side of the board (remember: there are two bishop files, so you have to know which bishop file is being referred to (in this case, the bishop file on the king's side of the board).

Now, let's look at black's second move, 2. ... N-QB3. The knight on the queen's side of the board is to be moved to the third rank (looking at the board from Black's point-of-view) on the bishop's file. White now makes his third move, 3. B-N5. Move the bishop (B) to the 5th rank (from White's point-of-view) on the knight's (N) file. You don't have to say 2. B-QN5. Do you see why? Finally, Black answers by moving his pawn on the rook (R) file to his third rank. You will have to say which rook's pawn: the one on the queen's side of the board or the one on the king's side of the board, so you would record your move as follows: 3. ... P-QR3. As you can see, descriptive notation is very, very simple to learn. Play through one game using this notation and you will have mastered it. Need more help, then see the article on descriptive notation at the Wikipedia website.

Posted on Sep 22, 2015 12:12:29 PM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on Sep 22, 2015 9:38:02 PM PDT]
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