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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Ineresting, but ..., June 27, 2008
This review is from: Mutiny: The True Events That Inspired The Hunt For Red October (Hardcover)
"Mutiny" by David Hagberg and Boris Gindin is the story of the real-life mutiny aboard the Soviet naval vessel Storoshevoy in 1975, an incident that sparked the creation of Tom Clancy's "The Hunt for Red October".

Gildin himself was an officer aboard the Storoshevoy, held prisoner by the mutineers, so a substantial portion of the book can be told from an eyewitness perspective, but nonetheless the story seemed to me to somehow lack the immediacy I would expect. For one thing, the lack of photographs and maps and ship's plans proves something of an obstacle in better envisioning what went on. And discussion of the aftermath of the failed mutiny is curiously lacking in detais. I was left feeling that I had read only half a story.
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Initial post: Jun 17, 2011 1:54:23 PM PDT
I agree that a lack of photographs and maps was unfortunate but I found thebook compelling and hard to put down. When I finished the book, I was left with a question. The real hero of the mutiny was Valery Sablin, the political officer. Sablin wished to repeat the 1905 mutiny on the battleship Potemkin and the October 1917 mutiny on the cruiser Aurora, which ultimately sparked the Comminist takeover. The goats of this story, if there are any of them, are the captain and the officers including Gindin who opposed the mutiny. Gindin implies strongly that had the mutiny accomplished the goals set by Sablin, it is possible that the Brezhnev government might have fallen and a man like Gorbachev would have come to power perhaps 5 or 6 years sooner or the Soviet fall would have occurred perhaps decade earlier than it did. Mutiny success however, would have required the support of the entire crew or the death of all those opposed but Sablin had no interest in seeing anyone die. Gindin followed orders although he knew those orders were wrong. Although Gindin opposed the mutiny, his naval career was over and so was his future in his country. He knew this before he opposed the mutiny but opposed it any way. Further, opposition to the mutiny almost certainly meant that Sablin would be executed possibly along with many others. Gindin knew this as well but he opposed the mutiny anyway.
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Bruce Trinque
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Location: Amston, CT United States

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