Customer Review

103 of 123 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The Sixth Discipline, February 18, 2008
This review is from: The Fifth Discipline: The Art & Practice of The Learning Organization (Paperback)
The Fifth Discipline contains some great concepts which are very usable in the day to day management of an organization.

Unfortunately, the author is very long-winded and over-explains concepts repeatedly - taking what should have been less than 50 pages of information and turning it into a 400 page behemoth that is difficult to slog through.

Several people to whom I have recommended this book have suggested that one order the fieldbook instead, as it contains all of the original work's raw information and models in a 17 page executive summary at the beginning. Most people seem to find that more usable than this book.
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Comments

Tracked by 2 customers

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Showing 1-10 of 10 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Apr 9, 2008 5:56:30 AM PDT
I just red this book. It is indeed full of interesting observations. Some of them will make you think more about the everyday work and some of them will probably stimulate some of you own Ideas about the communication with your colleagues. On the other hand, 450 pages can be reduced on the 100 pages maximum. Sometimes the Author gets lost in a see of examples, comparisons and words so that average reader lose a track. This book definitely has a bad structure which makes it even more difficult to comprehend. In summary: bunch of statements, ideas, information, comparisons......restructuring required immediately.

Posted on Feb 11, 2012 7:12:48 AM PST
Robert Levit says:
You are correct, great ideas can become long-winded and tedious. The Fieldbook is much better and offers different perspectives, exercises, etc.

In reply to an earlier post on May 6, 2012 7:56:38 AM PDT
Robert Levit, I agree. Something to note is the title on the last review is "the Sixth discipline" This book is the Fifth Discipline. Not to be picky but there is a book called the "sixth discipline" which is a science fiction book totally not related. This should be corrected.

While I too can be long winded, I am working hard on succinct and to the point. Thank you for your comments and I think "The Fifth Discipline" is an awesome and insightful book. Now that it is 6 yrs later the author definitely had long term vision because the learning organization structure is who is surviving now! I found the whole book (all 450 pages) worthy of my time and it stimulated thought. I don't think it was written for the "average" reader, rather to those who can think "outside the box". While all things can be use improvements, and I can appreciate the comments of Marijan, the were a bit harsh. P. Senge is an excellent author and this book is a very good work, loved and read by many very high level organizational thinkers.
Thanks.

Posted on May 6, 2012 7:59:50 AM PDT
Robert Levit, I agree. Something to note is the title on the last review is "the Sixth discipline" This book is the Fifth Discipline. Not to be picky but there is a book called the "sixth discipline" which is a science fiction book totally not related. This should be corrected.

While I too can be long winded, I am working hard on succinct and to the point. Thank you for your comments and I think "The Fifth Discipline" is an awesome and insightful book. Now that it is 6 yrs later the author definitely had long term vision because the learning organization structure is who is surviving now! I found the whole book (all 450 pages) worthy of my time and it stimulated thought. I don't think it was written for the "average" reader, rather to those who can think "outside the box". While all things can be use improvements, and I can appreciate the comments of Marijan, the were a bit harsh. P. Senge is an excellent author and this book is a very good work, loved and read by many very high level organizational thinkers.
Thanks.

Posted on May 31, 2012 8:25:18 AM PDT
Michael says:
Thank you for your review.

What "fieldbook" are you referring to? I would like to follow your advice and read that one instead

In reply to an earlier post on May 31, 2012 8:42:28 AM PDT
Hi Michael,
The Fifth Discipline Fieldbook: Strategies and Tools for Building a Learning Organization
The Fifth Discipline Fieldbook: Strategies and Tools for Building a Learning Organization
Hope this helps

Posted on Jan 1, 2013 6:12:22 PM PST
C. Stella says:
Amen! Senge writes just to hear himself talk. A drag to read and very disjointed and non-sensical.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 20, 2013 12:11:50 AM PDT
What a shame you find it to be a drag. Guess you should be reading the 'dummies guide to leadership', or perhaps that's too long - maybe a cereal packet blurb would be all you would need to make your organisation 'sing'. Why would one want to take the time for improved leadership? Gee sounds like a drag. Hope I too haven't been disjointed.

In reply to an earlier post on May 15, 2013 9:07:23 PM PDT
Arcturus76 says:
Well said M. McMahon!

Posted on Jun 15, 2014 3:20:31 PM PDT
Yes, of course ... take Les Miserables, for example. Long winded, takes a long time to read, when the whole story could be told in two or three paragraphs. But, there's a reason why this book is rated one of the greatest business books of all time, and why Les Miserables is a classic .... You'll have to read Victor Hugo on your own, but as for Senge's book, it's an enjoyable and readable classic, written in a way that you might experience the material if you sat down and had dinner with Senge himself. Fascinating concepts, valuable, and for many if not most readers, life changing. There is an old saying about how there is "always one" person out there who is going to get things completely wrong, and if you read Amazon book reviews, you will encounter those people constantly. This review by Mr. Redmond is a textbook example. Not everybody can get these things, but ... most people do.
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