Customer Review

36 of 38 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Death And The Civil War During the Sesquicentennial, September 13, 2012
This review is from: American Experience: Death & The Civil War (DVD)
Without a doubt, This Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War by Drew Gilpin Faust put the Civil War on the bestseller lists again. Published in 2008, Faust's work illuminated for many a new view of Ken Burns' Civil War 1990 series. Popular culture treats the American Civil War differently than scholars, buffs and reenactors treat the war. For popular culture the market place is a battlefield; products vie for mass attention and sales. Now during the 150th sesquicentennial of 1862, the public will likely take a glance at the Civil War. Ric Burns' Death and the Civil War will premiere on Tuesday September 18th on public broadcasting television. Based upon Faust's bestselling non-fiction work, Death and the Civil War is a sobering reminder that the Civil War was a landscape turned red by 750,000+ deaths in four years.

At 120 minutes, Burns' pace is deliberate and provocative. The opening segment is jarring. A few moments before his death, a Mississippi soldier begins writing a letter to his father. The man bleeds onto the paper has he haltingly reveals his last thoughts about his life, service, death and afterlife. Within this 12 minute preface viewers' hearts may begin to break. The images that Burns selects include photography from the era; within the images there are ghosts, individuals who moved during the 30 second to a minute and half exposure time. There are subtleties in the images and texts that may move past the causal viewer; such may be the estimate that of the 750,000+ deaths 50% were not identified by name.

The chapters are each about 15 minutes in length: Death, Burying, Naming, Honoring, Believing and Doubting, Accounting, and Remembering. Drew Gilpin Faust is the most frequently interviewed expert during the film; generally her remarks impart important facts but on one occasion it appears that she minimizes the 6,500+ deaths during the Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom campaigns. The individual being interviewed who is most likely to be remembered is Thomas Lynch, undertaker and poet. He remarks defines and gently elevates the bleak discussions that, at times, may approach melodrama. The narration by Oliver Platt and music compositions by Brian Keane are effective in conveying grief and hope. Is there an 'Ashoken Farewell' on the soundtrack. Yes, possibly two: A Thousand Thoughts [Tusen Tankar] and Republic of Suffering in acoustic and orchestral versions. Both the film and the soundtrack are immediately available after the Tuesday evening broadcast and they are worth every penny and much more. Ric Burns' Death And The Civil War is an exceptionally fine work in the field of television broadcasting and presentation of historic artifacts, photographs and sentiments.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No

[Add comment]
Post a comment
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Amazon will display this name with all your submissions, including reviews and discussion posts. (Learn more)
Name:
Badge:
This badge will be assigned to you and will appear along with your name.
There was an error. Please try again.
Please see the full guidelines here.

Official Comment

As a representative of this product you can post one Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
The following name and badge will be shown with this comment:
 (edit name)
After clicking the Post button you will be asked to create your public name, which will be shown with all your contributions.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.  Learn more
Otherwise, you can still post a regular comment on this review.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
 
System timed out

We were unable to verify whether you represent the product. Please try again later, or retry now. Otherwise you can post a regular comment.

Since you previously posted an Official Comment, this comment will appear in the comment section below. You also have the option to edit your Official Comment.   Learn more
The maximum number of Official Comments have been posted. This comment will appear in the comment section below.   Learn more
Prompts for sign-in
 

Comments

Tracked by 1 customer

Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-2 of 2 posts in this discussion
Initial post: May 19, 2013 1:41:07 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 19, 2013 1:42:47 PM PDT
Just how is it different from Ken Burns' CIVIL WAR? What does Ric cover that Ken missed? When one sees Ric's THE WAY WEST and compares it with Ken's THE WEST, you can see a clear difference where Ken took a "balanced" view of the Plains Wars while Ric told the story as it actually happened, that both the Native Americans and the Great American Bison were nearly destroyed by the "pious" pilgrims and later settlers!

So, in what way is Ric's Civil War film different than Ken's? Does it go into more detail about why it got started? Especially since The North did nothing for nearly a hundred years while Jim Crow was allowed to fester in the South?

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 16, 2013 3:42:36 PM PDT
CLJ says:
I haven't watched Burns' film lately, but I don't remember in depth discussion of death in his films.

I don't have a dog in the hunt about the war...war is ugly on ALL sides and this particular film made a point that the Federal Government (eventually) made efforts to identify dead Federal soldiers, but that they ignored the Southern soldiers. Do I personally agree with that tactic? No. Soldiers are soldiers, and IF the government had been REALLY playing by the rules, they wouldn't have made a distinction. BUT, there was plenty of ugliness to go around. There were atrocities on both sides...plenty to go around.
‹ Previous 1 Next ›

Review Details

Item

4.4 out of 5 stars (92 customer reviews)
5 star:
 (58)
4 star:
 (21)
3 star:
 (9)
2 star:
 (2)
1 star:
 (2)
 
 
 
$24.99 $14.66
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Reviewer


Top Reviewer Ranking: 199,818