Customer Review

395 of 401 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It is amazing, but is it worth the money?, October 29, 2007
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This review is from: Zojirushi CV-DSC40 VE Hybrid Water Boiler and Warmer, Stainless Steel (Kitchen)
I am a recently disabled adult that cannot get enough of a good cup of tea. So seeing this I thought it would make a nice birthday present for me, and make life a little easier around the kitchen. It performs as it says it will.

It looks bulky but is surprisingly lightweight and easy to handle. The whole unit spins on a lazy-susan device making it east to direct the steam vent away from kitchen surfaces.

You will need a water pitcher of some kind to fill this easily. I have a medium sized one sand simply filly the pitcher twice to fill this device once. The handle on top, removable lid, and notched corner makes emptying and cleaning a breeze.

The temperature features are splendid and accurate, there are three:
205 for noodles/ramen etc, herbal infusions, pu-er, Assam and some other black teas..
195 For Darjeeling or delicate blacks like Illam valley are at this temperature as well, let the water sit a few minutes in the brew pot befor adding tea leaves, if you have a very delicate tea.
175 for green or white teas. A few of the more delicate whites fill the tea pot first, then add the leaves. By filling your teapot dry first, this allows the water to lose 5-10F by just warming the pot. Often enough to make a better flavored tea.

On a given day I can go from pu-er tsocha right from boiling, and set the temp to 195. Make a pot of bold assam in the afternoon when at a full boil, then set the temp to 175. Now, after dinner it is set for making jasmine tea for dessert. All with a minimal energy usage and cost.

I have found it a good idea to refill it only 1-2 times then empty the remains, give it a brush inside with a towel, and then let it completely dry. My scale buildup was reduced quite a bit this way.

For a fully able person this unit -is- a bit of a luxury. A simple electric teapot with temperature control would do you just fine for a fraction of the initial cost. This will make cost up over time by the thermos nature though, just a fyi.

Have a chain tea drinker in your life though or thoughts for limited commercial use (like a small teahouse), or like tea but have a very full life and time schedule? This would make a great gift for you or even a small splurge to treat yourself.

UPDATE:
Almost two years later and it not only looks fine but functions just as well as the day I got it. I have to descale it about every 9 months or so. Other than that it is pretty maintenance free. Talk about longer term bang for your buck. If you drink tea or would use boiling water on a daily basis, this is a staple for your kitchen.

Some other uses I found. When making soup, rice, thinning a sauce, or deglazing a pan fill your measuring device from the Zojirushi set in slow pour. I now use water from the boiler and the hot water not only speeds up the process, but some flavors are left alone because the room temp water would have cooled the dish and altered the flavors.

I have also found the steel finish wipes very easily. A friend who bought the white version has some staining that stubbornly persists to this day. All in all if you get one you will not be disappointed.

(small edits made above with input from trial and error over the period I've owned this boiler.)
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Comments

Tracked by 11 customers

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Showing 1-10 of 21 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Apr 27, 2010 9:26:13 PM PDT
Thanks for taking the time to write an informative review.
Can't resist noting, however, that "a pot of bold assam" requires higher than 195 F to get the most out of tea. I specialize in assams and know of no exception. Roaring boil, just when it starts. In fact, instead of pouring hot water first, before the tea leaves, we assam people like to pre-warm the pot with boiling water.
Stay well!

In reply to an earlier post on May 29, 2010 11:52:51 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 29, 2010 11:53:09 AM PDT
K. Kurpiel says:
You are correct! I've tried it and it does effect the taste a little.
Some of the wonderful malty flavor is lost if it is not made while boiling.

Thanks for that catch and suggestion. My palate thanks you too.
Also if you like Assam, try the Vietnam Yen Bai OP Organic tea.
It's a tea estate that has been found after being left to overgrow
during the reformation there. The now wild leaves are being hand cultivated
and if you like Assam this will be a treat to your taste buds.

Posted on Jun 17, 2010 5:08:39 AM PDT
M C says:
A most helpful review. I was on the fence, and have decided to order this wonderful device. Thanks!

Posted on Jun 18, 2010 4:42:26 PM PDT
Anna says:
Very imformative review! I especially like that you told us how the machine is performing two years later.

One question--What is the boiling chamber made of? I recently switched from an electric kettle with plastic parts to a stovetop glass kettle because I wanted to avoid nasty chemicals in my coffee/tea/soup/etc. Is the interior metal, plastic, glass, something else? Thanks so much!!!

Posted on Jul 6, 2010 10:35:48 AM PDT
Thank you for that detailed review, and especially for the two-year update. You pushed me over the fence into buying one, as well!

Posted on Sep 25, 2010 9:08:17 AM PDT
Herb says:
You are saying that you use the pot's various temperature setting to make certain teas right? You are not putting the tea leaves inside the pot and brewing them from inside the pot right?

"On a given day I can go from pu-er tsocha right from boiling, and set the temp to 195. Make a pot of bold assam in the afternoon when at a full boil, then set the temp to 175. Now, after dinner it is set for making jasmine tea for dessert. All with a minimal energy usage and cost."

Posted on Nov 3, 2010 9:19:47 AM PDT
Does anyone know whether the actual boiler is aluminum or stainless steel? And does the hot water at any point come in contact with either aluminum or plastic (Is the see through guage glass or plastic, for example?). I want a water heater in which the water contacts on SS or glass. Thanks.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 24, 2011 8:09:27 PM PDT
Wildcat says:
Anyone have any updates on this ? I too am trying to find a completely plastic free option

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 4, 2011 12:48:35 PM PDT
Jamie Urbain says:
I think I can help answer your question...

This is the company's description of the CV-DSC40: http://www.zojirushi.com/products/cvdsc
They say the interior is a "Stainless steel double insulation wall," but all of their water boilers are also coated with non-stick. Browsing around I have heard that some people have to run a first few cycles to get rid of a bad taste/smell, but once they do that it is gone.
There are non-coated stainless steel water boilers out there, but they do not seem to last as long or have all of the features that Zojirushi pots offer.

Posted on Dec 6, 2011 1:35:23 PM PST
Odysseus says:
Would distilled water offer a solution to tap water scaling?? Costs $.83/g here.
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