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Customer Review

154 of 163 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Our generation's finest cookbook, October 6, 2007
This review is from: The Art of Simple Food: Notes, Lessons, and Recipes from a Delicious Revolution (Hardcover)
Nothing more to say: in every generation there exists one memorable cookbook behind which all others pale in comparison. In the early 60s, it was Mastering the Art of French Cooking; in the late 70s, it was Silver Palate. It's always been The Joy of Cooking, and Jean Anderson's Doubleday Cookbook. But for this generation, tired of overwrought recipes created by celeb TV chefs and meant for the restaurant kitchen, The Art of Simple Food is a brilliant instant classic packed with recipes that are as close to perfection as I've seen. This is a keeper that will endure for years and years.
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Showing 1-4 of 4 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Oct 11, 2007 7:57:43 AM PDT
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 14, 2009 5:31:45 PM PDT
Bettina,
Shame on you for trying to advertize your book club here.

Posted on Jul 9, 2009 11:43:08 AM PDT
Yes, that's one thing I have realized quite recently about books by restaurant chefs --- including Anthony Bourdain. They will throw in a long or difficult recipe without even thinking about the simple fact that "practice makes perfect."

As an example, cutting a whole chicken into its parts. We beginners need pictures and explanations. We may well take 10-15 minutes cutting up that chickie --- something which would get us instantly fired at a restaurant, where the chefs go through that exercise about 100 times a day! And the same goes for all the other "restaurant recipes." "Steak au Poivre" is a lot easier when you make it and serve it dozens of times PER DAY.

Think about your own experience in the kitchen. Most of us have recipes that we can make (almost) blindfolded. But the Gateau Saint-Honore is not among them!! :-)

Posted on Feb 14, 2015 4:14:01 PM PST
Do you still think this is THE cookbook to have? For someone who doesn't have any Alice Waters in her collection, though she's been a great admirer for years, which one would you suggest?
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