Customer Review

166 of 175 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Starter Receiver - Balances audio quality with Value, June 21, 2013
This review is from: Yamaha RX-V375 5.1 Channel 3D A/V Home Theater Receiver - (Discontinued by Manufacturer) (Electronics)
I got this receiver as a wedding present for one of my friends and from setup to audio quality to value, I was impressed. I am a little geeky when it comes to home audio and I helped him set it up. They wanted a receiver that they could listen to music in two rooms and watch movies/tv/play video games in their main room. I wanted to keep it under $300. The Yamaha met all these requirements and it delivers a great sound.

I've had a Denon 3808 for about 10 years and I have to say this Yamaha had many of the features and sound quality of the system I have and I paid a lot less for the Yamaha.

Pros:
- Impressive audio. I know speakers also play a role but this receiver made Polk Audio RM6750 (about $180) speakers sound amazing. I've heard good things about this Polk line but the clean and crisp sound I am giving credit to the Yamaha receiver. It provides well balanced sound with good highs, mids and lows.

- A variety of audio and video inputs. A lot of receivers in this price range have removed most all of their video and audio inputs in favor of HDMI only (Harmen Kardon 1700, I'm looking at you here). I liked that the Yamaha 375 gave people options of component and composite video inputs as well as a full complement of audio inputs. I especially liked that you can mix and match audio and video inputs depending on your set up. For example, you can tell it to do HDMI video with analog audio 1 for sound.

- Calibration was a breeze and made for impressive audio with the included mic. I wasn't super impressed with the initial sound when we hooked everything up but once we calibrated it using the mic, I went from underwhelmed to impressed. The texture on the sound was rich and encompassing and the bass was well integrated without muddiness or being too loud.

- Audio output. Again, this is a feature that has gone by the wayside for many receivers in this range. Loved that this one had it.

Semi-negatives:
- As with most receivers in this price range, the audio output will only route analog sources through them. HDMI and optical inputs will not be sent via the analog out. They only wanted to hear music in their kitchen, so it wasn't a huge deal and this was one of the only receivers in this range that had audio outputs.

- The receiver will not up-convert analog sources to HD. So any of the analog video sources will be sent straight through at whatever resolution it outputs. Again, not a big deal because most all of their equipment was HDMI with the exception of the audio plugin for their mp3 player.

Overall, they have been loving the set up and this was a great receiver for them. Because of how much the receiver impressed me, I will definitely consider the Yamaha line (likely one of the 375's big brothers) the next time I am getting a receiver. This one provides great value and great sound at a reasonable price. Highly recommended.
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Comments

Tracked by 6 customers

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Showing 1-10 of 29 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Aug 8, 2013 5:48:50 PM PDT
Rob says:
I have the same setup (rx-v375 with Polk rm6750) and was curious what the average volume the receiver was set to. I currently have mine at about -32.0db which when displayed on my Sharp tv is 50 (or halfway) and is about the same volume as my old Sony HTIB htsf470 at about 10 on that receiver which translated to about 20 on my TV volume. When I say TV volume I really mean Aquos Audio which is what it displays when an HDMI controlled device. Maybe it's similar to when you get a good clean amp with quality speakers for your car and how you have to turn it up louder than a stock radio but the sound is cleaner and you can go much higher before it starts distorting if it does at all. It just struck me as odd to be at halfway for "normal" viewing volume.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 9, 2013 7:35:09 AM PDT
C. Sun says:
I'm not completely sure about your question but I can give you some of my experience with db scales on receivers. The db scale is a logarithmic measure of intensity so the closer you get to 0db (decibels), as you turn it up, the faster it increases in loudness. 0db on a receiver is just a reference sound level that companies tune their systems to and everything below that is a negative number. Receivers that use db are usually referenced around 85db which is about as loud as a passing train that you are pretty close to. So when you say you are at -32db, it would mean you are listening to about 53db (Reference of 85db-32db), which is what normal conversations levels are for db.

There honestly isn't a whole lot of difference between -80db and -40db because you aren't all that close to 0db on the scale. However, you'll really start to hear a difference between -40db and 0db on a receiver.

I typically listen to tv shows around -28 to -24db with immersive action movies around -18db to -16db. I have never really been anywhere above the -10db range. It is just too loud even though my system can handle it. So you definitely have a lot more range in loudness between -32db and 0db than you think even though it shows you as about "halfway" on the -db scale on the receiver.

I say all of this because most tvs and electronics use pretty arbitrary scales of 10 or 50 or 100 when they do sound for consumers to make it easier. They also, typically, space out the sound intensity so that a one point increase in sound is the same throughout the scale. It doesn't really work like that for db, jumping from -50db to -40db isn't as big of a jump as -15db to -5db. It's just kind of how the math works out on decibels.

Hope this helps and made some sense given the question you had.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 10, 2013 6:29:26 AM PDT
Rob says:
Yes, that actually helps me out a lot. From the factory I see that "max volume" under options is set to +16.5 db, would it be wiser for me to change that to the 0db?

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 10, 2013 6:56:52 AM PDT
[Deleted by the author on Aug 10, 2013 6:57:17 AM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 10, 2013 6:59:14 AM PDT
C. Sun says:
I don't think you need to do that. Changing it would just change the reference point down 16db and so you'll just be cranking it up those extra 16db to get the same sound you get now at -32db, you'll get at -16db. As long as your system can handle it and it is comfortable listening for what you are doing, I wouldn't worry about the number that is says. You aren't doing any damage to your system as you get closer to 0db or even go positive db - again, as long as your system, specifically your speakers, can handle it. But for your ears sake, I wouldn't regularly try to get close to 0db.

Enjoy the system at whatever db works for you, that's really all that is important. Your system can probably handle a lot louder db than what you end up liking for your various tv shows, movies and music.

Note: I accidentally posted the reply from my wife's account, so that was the deleted post.

Posted on Sep 26, 2013 10:48:30 AM PDT
Tech Hound says:
I use a laptop for all music / movies via HDMI. Can you explain what you mean by "As with most receivers in this price range, the audio output will only route analog sources through them. HDMI and optical inputs will not be sent via the analog out. They only wanted to hear music in their kitchen, so it wasn't a huge deal and this was one of the only receivers in this range that had audio outputs."

Also... "The receiver will not up-convert analog sources to HD. So any of the analog video sources will be sent straight through at whatever resolution it outputs. Again, not a big deal because most all of their equipment was HDMI with the exception of the audio plugin for their mp3 player."

Configuration: I use a laptop via HDMI to my TV. New setup would be latpop via HDMI to receiver, via HDMI to TV (1080).

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 22, 2013 11:25:20 AM PDT
C. Sun says:
Hey there,

Sorry it took a month to respond. I don't check up on the comment thread all the time and must have missed the e-mail notification.

Anyways, in terms of your questions - any analog audio signal will only be outputted via analog outputs and any analog video signal will only be outputted via analog video outputs from the receiver. Same goes for digital stuff. They don't cross over outputs, so you can't have a digital signal going to an analog output and vice versa.

The way you describe your set up, you will be fine. It is a digital HDMI connection to the receiver and a digital HDMI connection to the TV.

Hope that helps!

Posted on Nov 16, 2013 6:24:56 AM PST
Rigil says:
I am considering buying this receiver in the near future. I am wondering if I need to purchase an amplifier. If so, how many channels must it have? Thanks in advance for your reply.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 19, 2013 12:09:19 PM PST
C. Sun says:
Jose,

This receiver will do all of what an amplifier can do including input selection, volume control and power to drive your speakers. You won't need a separate amplifier to use this receiver.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 19, 2013 12:23:15 PM PST
Rigil says:
Thanks! The last system I bought was in the 90's.
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