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Customer Review

119 of 131 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Be Prepared to Have Your Ideas about Health Challenged, April 14, 2011
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This review is from: Health At Every Size: The Surprising Truth About Your Weight (Paperback)
This week, when we were in Las Vegas, I finished reading Dr. Linda Bacon's book Health At Every Size: The Surprising Truth About Your Weight.

Bacon didn't coin the term Health at Every Size (HAES), as she points out in the book. It was a movement before her involvement. But she has written a book that spells it out in a very readable, understandable way.

Health at Every Size starts with a discussion about the social and cultural myths surrounding weight. She talks about how at different times in the last century, women's magazines have had articles about how to GAIN weight, instead of how to lose it. Maybe the most important lesson in the book is how the weight loss industry, which includes government agencies, lies and manipulates statistics in order to make us believe that if we are fat, we are going to die.

1.) We're all going to die. Skinny does not equal immortal. (In case you were wondering.)

2.) The Center for Disease Control helped to design the `obesity crisis' with false statistics.

3.) The act of trying to obtain a `perfect' weight causes far more health problems than the act of trying to be as healthy as possible at your current weight, whatever that may be.

The first part of this book, for me anyway, felt like a battle cry.

The next part of the book talks about Health at Every Size and how to implement it into your life.

I'll admit something here. I skipped ahead to section two. And I was confused. Because I was looking for menu plans and concrete steps to follow. I've read a lot of diet and `life style change' books, starting with Susan Powter and ending right here. They all have steps to follow.

This book doesn't break HAES down that way, and at first I was confused. Because-well, how am I supposed to do this if you don't tell me how? Where are the charts? What about a training schedule or a list of HAES friendly snacks?

Then I went back and read from the beginning. (This was one of those times that my penchant for reading books backwards didn't work out for me.)

Turns out that HAES isn't a diet. I was a little slow integrating that information, because I actually knew that going in. It isn't a fitness plan. It isn't anything other than a validation, permission to treat yourself well right this minute. So Bacon's section two talks more about easing yourself out of what may well be a decades long addiction to dieting. It gives you permission to exercise because it's fun and feels good, or even as training, rather than as a punishment for the sin of being fat. To enjoy whatever food you want to eat-literally, whatever food-without putting a moral judgment on it.

HAES breaks down like this:

1. Love yourself. Yourself today, not yourself 10 or 50 or 150 pounds from now. Your body is just your body, it is neutral morally.

2. Eat good food, eat what you want and enough of it, and stop when you're full.

3. Move because it feels good, it is good for your health (yes, even if you never lose a pound) and it's fun.

Deceptively simple, right?

Bacon does talk some about set points and how you may be keeping your body above its comfortable weight by eating past when you're full and avoiding exercise. I was impressed, however, that she didn't turn this into a weight loss book.

Eating well and moving your body moderately will improve your fitness and your health-even if your body never gives up a single pound.

If you're anything like me, you have so many years of `accepting' that your health and your weight are intricately tied, that turning that off is really difficult. It's one thing to say "I can be fat and still fit" and another to believe it deep down. Even in the face of evidence that it's true. Even knowing that feeling like you have to thin before you earn being fit is a response to cultural conditioning.

You can buy this book on Amazon for about $10. You might be able to get it from your library. However you get it, prepare to have your ideas about your body, you culture and yourself be challenged.
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Comments

Tracked by 4 customers

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Showing 1-9 of 9 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Jun 17, 2011 5:21:06 PM PDT
oolala53 says:
I tried to eat intuitively for years. It proved too hard to stop myself from overeating processed foods, esp. sweets. The End of Overeating helped me understand that. Volumetrics, The 40-30-30 Plan, The Zone Diet, and The Omega Diet, plus whole grain cooking classes, helped me find more satisfying foods. Mindless Eating helped me see that even normal weight people with relatively normal relationships with food will overeat in the face of excess. And The No S Diet has finally given me the structure and freedom to put it all together. I'm not thin, but I'm getting slimmer and I am definitely happier.

Posted on Dec 15, 2012 6:49:16 PM PST
"The Center for Disease Control helped to design the `obesity crisis' with false statistics."

Bullocks. I don't need any "center for disease control" to tell me that everyone around me is getting HUGE. My eyes work perfectly, and I see an alarming number of morbidly obese people riding around in scooters. Back in the 80's, when I was a kid, I never saw such a thing. Sure, there were a few "chunky" types, but nothing like now. This problem is getting worse and worse, and people like you and the author of this book are wallowing in a heap of denial.

Posted on Dec 15, 2012 6:54:57 PM PST
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

Posted on Jan 3, 2013 11:53:29 AM PST
Emily says:
Spacemonkey is an wrong on both comments. I've read this book and Intuitive Eating by Tribole and Resch and completely understand and see where the "obesity crisis" came from. Anyone notice that the more America has dieted, the fatter they've gotten. I never dieted in my life. While I wasn't thin or average nor was I wasn't obese. That is, I wasn't obese, until I tried to diet for two years and got the the heaviest I've ever been.

After following Intuitive Eating (which credits HAES by Bacon in several parts) through a pregnancy I am proof that eating what you like won't make you fatter unless your body needs it. I gained 30 lbs with that pregnancy but within 2 1/2 weeks I was 1 lb away from where it started.

This is a GREAT REVIEW of the book and I'd encourage anyone to read it too along with the third (newest) edition of Intuitive Eating. I own both and couldn't be happier or smaller than I've been in years

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 20, 2013 3:49:47 PM PST
I agree, good review which has persuaded me to buy the book.

And I'm glad someone else reads books backwards ... but I find that more difficult on my Kindle!

Posted on Aug 21, 2013 9:19:53 AM PDT
Katharos says:
Hi Shaunta, Thank you for your extremely helpful and well-written review. I really appreciate you having taken the time to put it together. I have a much clearer idea of what I will find in the book, how to read it (not backwards :]), and whether it's the right book for me. This is great! Thank you!

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 23, 2014 5:06:10 PM PST
Yours isn't even of you. You're just mad that this isn't something you can use to make yourself feel better than others anymore. Get over it.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 24, 2014 6:23:05 AM PST
[Deleted by Amazon on Aug 18, 2015 12:17:45 AM PDT]

Posted on Jun 17, 2015 8:30:37 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 17, 2015 11:42:02 PM PDT
ZWXXYZ says:
This reviewer mentions the weight loss industry. Stop smoking, drug and alcohol rehabilitation are also profitable and there is a high relapse rate among smokers and alcohol and drug abusers. Should people continue to smoke, drink and use drugs?

1.) we're all going to die. Skinny does not equal immortal (in case you were wondering)
No one was wondering. Even small children know we do not live forever. The point is the length and quality of your life. As a person moves from overweight to obese to morbidly obese, the less mobile, the more diseases a person will have. Fatness does equal a shorter poor quality life.
" We're all going to die. Sobrity does not equal immortal. Hey, let's get drunk !"

2.) The Center for Disease Control helped to design the 'obesity crises' with false statistics.
I can't say anything about the CDC and statistics, but I can remember when I was younger there were not so many fat children and adults as now. So can everyone.

3.) The act of trying to obtain perfect weight causes far more health problems than the act of trying to be as healthy as possible at your current weight, whatever that may be.
And if a fat person gets fatter, should that person be healthy at the fatter weight? How fat is too fat? If perfection is impossible should we not even try? What health problems can be caused by a slow gradual weight loss?

"Fatlogic", as a compound word is a neologism to describe how fat people try to justify staying fat.
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