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39 of 42 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars From Sumer over Africa to America, July 25, 2000
This review is from: The Lost Realms: Book IV of the Earth Chronicles (Mass Market Paperback)
In this volume Sitchin compares Mesopotamia, Egypt and ancient American civilizations an comes to conclusion, that gods have visited America also. The reason for visit was simple - they have found precious metals like gold and copper, but they have also found tin, which has to be extracted from ores and gives hard bronze when mixed with copper. The sophisticated channels cut in the rocks were part of ore washing system. The resemblance of stories, buildings and myths suggests that behind names like Quetzalcoatl, Kukulcan and Viracocha stand the same deities we know from the first three volumes. The most impressive thing is that Americans didn't knew and use metals (except gold, of course), yet archaeologists have found stone blocks dressed and connected with bronze claps. And bronze must be obtained through a metallurgical process, which was surely not known nor to Mayas, Incas or Aztecs. Who needed tin from lake Titicaca? The answer is obvious.
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Showing 1-2 of 2 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Jun 9, 2008 9:17:29 AM PDT
John Sword says:
No, the answer is not obvious at all. Why would an advanced space faring culture have the need for low quality materials as copper, bronze or tin? Unless the Anunnaki were stranded on planet Earth and that was all they could hope to get their hands on, including gold.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 18, 2013 3:48:05 PM PST
S. Turner says:
If you read the prior book by Sitchin all of that is explained. They needed these metals because of a shortage of gold on their own planet as well as to help construct things here on Earth. The gold was needed to help protect their waning atmoshere on the home planet Nibiru.
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