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Customer Review

68 of 69 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars a very decent jumbo planisphere, December 7, 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Guide to the Stars (Map)
Pros:
-all plastic (not paper or laminated paper)...won't get soggy if it gets wet
-kids will probably like the jumbo 16" diameter size (it is also available in 11" diameter size)
-useful information on the front and back (like meteor shower dates)
-works for latitudes between 30 and 60 degrees North
-several lesser-known stars are named; for example Zaurak, Sabik and Algorab
-a lot less crowded than smaller planispheres
Cons:
-For its jumbo size, I was expecting more celestial objects & detail...the dimmer, harder-to-find Messier objects are not shown. But it looks like it was designed more for beginners, in which case this makes good sense.
-Messier objects are marked by a letter, and you must flip the planisphere over to 'decipher' the letter. For example, M35 in Gemini is simply labelled as 'H'. It should just be labelled as 'M35' on the front in the first place.
-sometimes the same letter represents two or three seperate Messier objects. For example, M36, M37, and M38 in Auriga are all designated by three seperate letter 'F's. The description on the back distinguishes them seperately, but it's annoying.
-floppy due to it being relatively thin for its size
A planisphere like this is essenial for beginners to learn the night sky. If you are more advanced and need more detail, get a star map (but you'll probably still use your planisphere too).
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Showing 1-3 of 3 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Sep 26, 2012 4:06:42 PM PDT
OkieFlyer says:
The reason that few deep sky objects are placed on a planisphere is because a planisphere is meant to help people learn the naked-eye sky. Once familiar with the sky, an observer can then consult a star chart to locate deep sky objects such as those in the Messier catalog.

Posted on Jul 14, 2014 7:33:00 PM PDT
M. Kettler says:
At least two of the cons is no longer present in the current edition. Of course, it is 10.5 years after your review, so progress is to be expected.

- All the messier objects are now labeled as such. M35, is just M35, not H. No looking up letters on the back. The same goes for the few non-messier NGC objects (ie: NGC2451) and Collinder objects (ie: CR135) that are on the chart.

- M36, M37 and M38 are also just that on the map, so there is also no re-use of letters anymore.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 17, 2015 4:46:47 AM PST
Paul says:
Very helpful comment!
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