Truck Month Textbook Trade In Amazon Fashion Learn more Discover it Sixx AM Tile Wearable Technology Fire TV with 4k Ultra HD Gifts for Mom to look and feel great Mother's Day Gifts Shop now Amazon Gift Card Offer seeso seeso seeso  Amazon Echo  Echo Dot  Amazon Tap  Echo Dot  Amazon Tap  Amazon Echo Fire, Only $39.99 Kindle Paperwhite AutoRip in CDs & Vinyl ReadyRide Bikes from Diamondback STEM
Customer Review

37 of 43 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Turning failure on its back and dissecting the particulars can take us into the next realm of our growth and expression, March 26, 2014
This review is from: The Rise: Creativity, the Gift of Failure, and the Search for Mastery (Hardcover)
There are many famous achievements noted in THE RISE, but the most salient point about failure and what it provides the person who has failed in a particular endeavor comes from a member of Scott’s failed Arctic bid, Navy Explorer George Nares: “It is true that we failed to bring home the North Pole as a national present to the world, but those who regret that circumstance may be consoled with the knowledge that failure implants more deeply in all breasts the desire to excel.” THE RISE attempts to make the case that the lessons learned from spectacular failures can only enhance and support the masterpieces that come when anyone is forced to confront the bad and reconstruct an idea into its inevitable success.

Sarah Lewis doesn’t have a huge history with failure herself. She has a BA from Harvard, a Masters of Philosophy from Oxford, and is getting a Ph.D. from Yale this year. She has been a curator at the Tate Modern and MOMA in New York. She was on Obama’s Arts Policy Committee, on Oprah’s “Power List” and a Critic at the Yale University School of Art in the MFA program. Is it possible for someone this accomplished (and under 40) to really understand what failure is for most people? Well, Lewis doesn’t bother with any stories about ordinary people. Instead, she fills the book with tales from those who, despite searching for success at some point in their lives, found huge fame and accolades later on after a period of reconstruction and reinvention.

Mythmaker J.K. Rowling, choreographer Paul Taylor and activist Frederick Douglass are all examples of famous personages who suffered the slings and arrows of fate, who survived periods of lowdown depression and endless negative reinforcement only to take those anger-inducing, frustrating circumstances and turn them into lauded achievements later on. Lewis believes that this type of resilience is possible for anyone and that these examples serve to prove that it is truly possible to recreate oneself or one’s work into something that will find purpose in the greater world.

One of the things that brings Lewis’s sources to this point after a situation that would cause most people to run for cover and never try again is what she refers to as “grit.” The resilience to take failure and continue moving towards a goal, by rethinking the original plan or just going forward with a new project in the face of past failure, requires a certain mindset. Lewis says, “Grit is a portable skill that moves across seemingly varied interests. Grit can be expressed in your chosen pursuit and appears in multiple domains over time. It can be expressed through the pursuit of painting, and then through the invention of the telegraph.” Switching course and finding new ways to attempt your particular adventure is a necessary but learnable skill that helps people meet their potential. She spends a good part of the book discussing how other theorists agree that training kids to excel in “grit” would be a progressive step in truly preparing the young for inheriting our flawed world.

Lewis writes like an academic; this is no cozy Dr. Dyer book with everything boiled down to simplistic platitudes that would find refuge on cat posters. It is a very thoughtful look at turning lemons into lemonade. Turning failure on its back and dissecting the particulars can take us into the next realm of our growth and expression. Lewis thinks it’s possible, and after reading THE RISE, I have to say I believe her.

Reviewed by Jana Siciliano
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No

[Add comment]
Post a comment
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Amazon will display this name with all your submissions, including reviews and discussion posts. (Learn more)
Name:
Badge:
This badge will be assigned to you and will appear along with your name.
There was an error. Please try again.
Please see the full guidelines here.

Official Comment

As a representative of this product you can post one Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
The following name and badge will be shown with this comment:
 (edit name)
After clicking the Post button you will be asked to create your public name, which will be shown with all your contributions.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.  Learn more
Otherwise, you can still post a regular comment on this review.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
 
System timed out

We were unable to verify whether you represent the product. Please try again later, or retry now. Otherwise you can post a regular comment.

Since you previously posted an Official Comment, this comment will appear in the comment section below. You also have the option to edit your Official Comment.   Learn more
The maximum number of Official Comments have been posted. This comment will appear in the comment section below.   Learn more
Prompts for sign-in
  [Cancel]

Comments

Track comments by e-mail
Tracked by 1 customer

Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-1 of 1 posts in this discussion
Initial post: May 22, 2014 1:45:49 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 22, 2014 2:59:26 PM PDT
J. Walkup says:
Excuse me, but I find myself baffled by your reference to Sir George Nares as being "a member of Scott's failed Arctic bid". What Scott and what Arctic bid are you referring to? Surely not the celebrated Robert Falcon Scott, the Antarctic explorer? After all, Captain Scott was 7 years old at the time of Nares Arctic expedition. The Cambridge University Scott Polar Institute that is dedicated to his memory, and that of other explorers of both poles, lists the members of the Nares expedition, but there is no Scott among them. Captain Nares himself is identified as the Expedition leader. To my knowledge, Captain Scott never attempted to reach the North Pole, or tried any other Arctic venture. Or, is there another Scott renowned for Arctic rather than Antarctic exploration?
‹ Previous 1 Next ›