Customer Review

364 of 386 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If you are considering buying any other canner........., February 8, 2004
This review is from: All American 921 21-1/2-Quart Pressure Cooker/Canner (Kitchen)
send me the money and I'll throw it away for you. I received my Grandmother's when she passed away and have more that pleased with it. I can't add anything the other reviews other that mine is over 30 year old it is in perfect shape. I've been told that my Grandmother sent 1000's of cans through this in her day and I intend to do the same. The company's web site is very good if you need replacement parts but I doubt you'll ever need them. I had my local Ag extension agent test my gauge (the original) and it is still accurate enough for canning. This is the only part that should ever really need replacing since it does not have a seal. I am fortunate enough to have the old school Instruction and Recipes book (list price ˘60) that has canning recipes that I have not been able to find anywhere else. Buy this and pass it on to your grandchildren!!!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No

[Add comment]
Post a comment
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Amazon will display this name with all your submissions, including reviews and discussion posts. (Learn more)
Name:
Badge:
This badge will be assigned to you and will appear along with your name.
There was an error. Please try again.
Please see the full guidelines here.

Official Comment

As a representative of this product you can post one Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
The following name and badge will be shown with this comment:
 (edit name)
After clicking the Post button you will be asked to create your public name, which will be shown with all your contributions.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.  Learn more
Otherwise, you can still post a regular comment on this review.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
 
System timed out

We were unable to verify whether you represent the product. Please try again later, or retry now. Otherwise you can post a regular comment.

Since you previously posted an Official Comment, this comment will appear in the comment section below. You also have the option to edit your Official Comment.   Learn more
The maximum number of Official Comments have been posted. This comment will appear in the comment section below.   Learn more
Prompts for sign-in
 

Comments

Tracked by 4 customers

Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-10 of 16 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Sep 14, 2008 12:16:19 AM PDT
About the Old School Instructions... I like the good ole recipes too, but just make sure you check with your local extension office regarding the times and/or pressures when canning your old recipes. The USDA has changed a lot of rules since "The Good Ole Days"! ;-)

Posted on Jun 13, 2009 11:20:11 AM PDT
Best lead in line in a review and great info. A+!! Thanks!

Posted on Aug 17, 2009 11:59:30 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 17, 2009 12:00:46 PM PDT
PA Quilter says:
I have some canning books from my Grandma too..."Victory Garden Canning", etc. But the previous comment is correct...the reason we can't find those good ole recipes anywhere is because some of them are no longer considered safe. I just have to wonder though, have we gotten smarter & did people die from canning back then. Grandma didn't kill anyone as far as I know and no one got sick??? Just wondering...

Posted on Nov 29, 2009 10:20:42 PM PST
Betty Cooper says:
Could not believe these are still for sale. I've had mine for 40+ years. I bought it soon after I married 43 yrs ago. I have canned a 1000 + jars and it still works great. I think I gave @ 30 dollars for it back then and thought that was a major investment. If they're still made as well , I'd advise anyone to buy it.

Posted on Nov 29, 2009 10:27:01 PM PST
Betty Cooper says:
Could not believe these are still for sale. I've had mine for 40+ years. I bought it soon after I married 43 yrs ago. I have canned a 1000 + jars and it still works great. I think I gave @ 30 dollars for it back then and thought that was a major investment. If they're still made as well , I'd advise anyone to buy it.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 7, 2010 6:35:10 PM PST
Hi, Quilter, the truth is that some of the fruits and vegetables HAVE changed. It is to do with the acidity levels of the products which we are canning. Just for example, some tomatoes are not as acidic as they once were, so they will take longer time. Also, apparently, the heat does not always penetrate thick items like strained pumpkin and therefore the pumpkin ought instead to be cubed for canning.
Various safety ideas are added as they are discovered.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 28, 2011 1:04:36 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Mar 28, 2011 1:06:59 PM PDT
Kay Shepherd says:
Echoing the statements about using current approved (cooperative extension/USDA/etc) recipes. Some of our produce has changed. And research is continually being done that reveals more than we used to know, which means some practices have changed. And, yes, people did in all likelyhood die sometimes from botulism from poor canning practices. The symptoms look a lot like a heart-attack and we have better pathology now than we used to as well (which is to say, we don't know how many may have died from that cause).

Not every mistake results in a death or maybe even an illness. But it's kinda like playing Russian roulette. You may be fine for 2,000 jars and 10 or more years (who knows?) and then get the bad one that makes someone sick or worse.

You can use "grandma's" (older) recipes IF you can find them in current publications from reputable sources - some have stood the test of time.

So Easy To Preserve New & Revised Edition is highly recommended by my local cooperative extension as well as the Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving.

Posted on Sep 10, 2012 8:08:57 PM PDT
Ms. Jolly says:
Does yours still have the petcock? or the pressure regulator weight? I was given mine, it was my Step-mom's. I can't find any manuals online that refer to the petcock and how to use it..not even at All-American. I want to make sure I use it right so that what I can is good, but am nervous and would wish I could find a manual. I'm not even sure how old mine is, but its at least 40 years or more old. Am so thankful for it though for sure!!!

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 3, 2012 1:30:42 PM PDT
Prima Shani says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 19, 2012 1:38:29 PM PST
Hopefully everyone knows this but Prima, your advice is EXTREMELY wrong. It's not the living germs that will kill you it's the toxins they create in the food. Those toxins are extremely heat stable, cooking does nothing to them. If you suspect something may have been canned improperly throw it out!
‹ Previous 1 2 Next ›

Review Details

Item

4.8 out of 5 stars (1,109 customer reviews)
5 star:
 (1,009)
4 star:
 (63)
3 star:
 (16)
2 star:
 (3)
1 star:
 (18)
 
 
 
$368.00 $209.99
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Reviewer


Location: Rapid City, SD United States

Top Reviewer Ranking: 1,831,434