Customer Review

64 of 73 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Using very Fast memory SDHC Class 10 UHS-1 Flash Memory Card 95MB/s to get 1 second response time between shoots, August 14, 2013
This review is from: Nikon COOLPIX L28 20.1 MP Digital Camera with 5x Zoom Lens and 3" LCD (Red) (OLD MODEL) (Camera)
Nikon COOLPIX L28 20.1 MP Digital Camera with 5x Zoom Lens and 3" LCD or any small digital compact camera. I you want fast response time between your next shoot, you have to use very fast SDHC Class 10 UHS-1 Flash memory card 45/MB/s or 95MB/s. Normally this type of memory is used in DSLR cameras, but will work in any camera that can take SDHC memory card. I found this out about 6 years ago when taking pictures at a track event. I was missing getting the winner crossing the finish line, because of slow response using SDHC 10/MB/s memory. Another guy who was also taking pictures heard me complaining about missing the shots & told me about using 30/MB/s which was the fastest during that time. I later bought it & have been changing out my camera (for more megapixel & the faster memory every 3 to 3 years). With the faster memory you get one (1) second response time between your next shoot, instead of 6 to 8 seconds when using SDHC 10/MB/s memory card. I am currently using the SDHC Class 10 UHS-1 Flash memory card 95MB/s.

You have to pay more than $10 or $15 for the fastest memory so that you get 1 second response time between shots.

As of 08-14-2013 here are some Amazon price on the Fastest SDHC Class 10 UHS-1 flash memory cards for 45/MB/s or 95MB/s.

SanDisk Extreme 16 GB SDHC Class 10 UHS-1 Flash Memory Card 45MB/s by Scan Disk
Price $16.82 & free shipping on orders over $25.00, List Price: $48.99

SanDisk Extreme 32 GB SDHC Class 10 UHS-1 Flash Memory Card 45MB/s by Scan Disk
Price $27.99 & free shipping, List Price: $78.99

SanDisk Extreme 64 GB SDXC Class 10 UHS-1 Flash Memory Card 45MB/s by Scan Disk
Price $57.99 & free shipping, List Price: $199.99

SanDisk Extreme 128 GB SDXC Class 10 UHS-1 Flash Memory Card 45MB/s by Scan Disk
Price $123.99 & free shipping, List Price: $174.99

SanDisk Extreme Pro 8 GB SDHC Class 10 UHS-1 Flash Memory Card 95MB/s by Scan Disk
Price $23.63 & free shipping on orders over $25.00, original List Price: $62.99

SanDisk Extreme Pro 16 GB SDHC Class 10 UHS-1 Flash Memory Card 95MB/s by Scan Disk
Price $38.39 & free shipping, original List Price: $78.99

SanDisk Extreme Pro 32 GB SDHC Class 10 UHS-1 Flash Memory Card 95MB/s by Scan Disk
Price $63.22 & frees shipping Regular $199.00

SanDisk Extreme Pro 64 GB SDXC Class 10 UHS-1 Flash Memory Card 95MB/s by Scan Disk
Price $132.52 & frees shipping Regular $349.99
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Showing 1-6 of 6 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Sep 19, 2013 5:54:50 PM PDT
GT68 says:
this is incredibly helpful information. speed is hugely important to me as a home inspector. I cant wait for a slow camera. But I need a cheap one cause they tend to get a tad beat up : ) thanks for the tip!!! guess its time to pony up for a speedy San Disc. Although they wouldnt honor their warranty on a card I bought years ago. Suggestions for a different brand with the same speed?

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 20, 2013 6:43:12 AM PDT
M. Towles says:
I have been using SanDisk for my cameras fast memory for more that 10 years & have never had a problem with any of mines.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 25, 2013 7:55:05 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 25, 2013 7:58:32 AM PST
W. Cornett says:
A big factor in the SD card write times is the ever increasing pixel size of cheap digital cameras. The public keeps buying them because they have the notion that more pixels equals a sharper picture. More pixels on the same size sensor means grainier photos in low light because the pixels are smaller and collect less light. 8 - 10 megapixels will produce a very sharp 8x10 enlargement at 300dpi and can be stretched further with slight loss of quality. Also consider that any image displayed on a 1080p computer monitor or HDTV has to be downsized in software to 2.1 mp to fit the 16:9 frame format. So you see that all this megapixel race is just silliness and creates overly large files that take up more disk space. That's why many of the more expensive point and shoot cameras are in the 10 - 12 mp range. They take better pictures and can write them to a card much quicker because of the smaller file size and a faster processor.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 30, 2014 10:15:26 AM PST
A.V. says:
VERY astute observation!! Thanks for the comment, I had not thought of this. I was about to purchase a 20mgp, but now will look for something in the 10-12 range.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 30, 2014 11:57:09 AM PST
M. Towles says:
A 10 to 12 mgp picture is not as clear as a 20 mpg when taken with 95Mb/s SDHC memory card. You can control the size of you picture size by what you chose during setup of you camera. I just leave mines at the camera default (large size or lots of pixels) & have great shots with all of them I have a 10 Mpg camera & a 20 Mpg cameras & used the same SDHC card in both and the 20 mpg camera took the best pictures.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 1, 2015 12:52:31 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 1, 2015 12:54:12 PM PST
W. Cornett says:
The memory card has no relation to sharpness of the photo, just the write speed. The critical factors of sharpness is lens quality, vibration reduction in the camera, ISO setting, and the photographer. Use a tripod or other camera support when shooting in low light. Over 12MP won't gain you any noticeable clarity on an inexpensive compact point and shoot camera because the pixels have to be so tiny to fit on the small CMOS sensor that they have a problem collecting adequate light. Pixel density is directly related to sensor size and the sub $300 cameras currently have small 1/2.3" sensors with densely packed pixels. Do a search for "camera sensor size" if you're interested. Your comparison of cameras you own doesn't take in all the factors to make the statement that the larger megapixel count alone is the cause of the better photo. You don't say what types of cameras you are using, that makes a huge difference, is the 20 MP camera a DSLR? If you view the photos on a 1080p computer screen or a HDTV you're viewing on a 2.1 MP display so how can you tell? Printing poster size prints is where the benefits of 10+ megapixels is seen.
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