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Customer Review

25 of 28 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not groundbreaking, but a good resource, February 2, 2006
This review is from: Why Intelligent Design Fails: A Scientific Critique of the New Creationism (Hardcover)
So as not to rehash the better reviews by others, let me list a couple of things I liked about this book:

1. As a person who is skeptical of outlandish claims on both sides of this debate, I was pleasantly surprised at the restrained nature of this book. The opening chapter, written by one of the editors, sets the stage by going to great pains to admit that ID is not intriniscally forbidden from the scientific forum (p. 17), and that it is at least theoretically possible that future research could validate some form of ID (p. 18). This in constrast to many scientists would bar ID from the table forever. Of course, this point is only theoretical at present, since the book is all about how ID fails as science (and mathematics).

2. Unlike many anthologies, this book, especially in the first half, is quite self-conscious about not being repetitive; the chapter authors frequently refer the reader to other chapters that look at other aspects of their assigned topic.

3. While most of the chapters are informative and useful, two are particularly so, perhaps because they are not as focused on refuting Behe and Dembski. Chapter 3 is an excellent discussion of why common descent cannot be limited to the certain classification levels. This chapter addresses ID proponents who allow for a great deal of common descent and those who allow for very little. While the former are getting more press these days, the latter are still active in large numbers.

4. Chapter 7 is a fascinating look at how nature can, and demonstrably does, produce complexity and apparent design. This is probably the most approachable chapter in the book.

5. Chapters 9-11, although a bit repetitive and overly technical, provide a good introduction to some important statistical issues, including a nice discussion of random chance versus natural selection.

Overall, this is a good resource for various arguments to counter Behe and Dembski, as well as more general arguments. Some chapters, however, are not as approachable to the lay reader and may not be as useful in that regard.
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Showing 1-2 of 2 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Mar 14, 2007 7:41:54 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Dec 14, 2010 1:31:18 PM PST
A customer says:
Does the book contain evolutionary explanations for these powerful arguments for ID/creation:

1. The origin of meiosis (the splitting of the chromosomes to produce a sperm and an egg), and the origin of associated male and female reproductive organs. This has been described as the `queen of evolutionary problems'.
2. The origin of consciousness. This has been described as the `king of evolutionary problems'.
3. The epigenetic code that controls the genetic code.
4. Poly-functional DNA in the human genome, where more than 60% (about 1600) of a sample of genes were found to code for transcriptional units on the sense and the anti-sense DNA strands.
5. The irreducible complexity of protein targeting (zip codes). The amino-acid sequence on proteins that specifies where proteins are to be targeted only works if the golgi complex exists. Without protein targeting, the cell will not function.
6. The origin of the ribosome, the cell organelle that is absolutely essential for protein synthesis which is composed of about fifty large molecules (mainly proteins) and over one million atoms.
7. The origin of the spliceosome, the complex cellular machine responsible for performing the precise task of removing introns and joining together exons to form mRNA.
8. The origin of the RNA polymerase enzymes, which catalyse transcription of DNA and RNA strands.
9. The origin of the DNA polymerase enzyme, which catalyses the elongation of a new DNA strand during DNA replication.
10. The origin of ATP, the energy source absolutely essential for cell functioning.
11. The origin of chaperones, which are barrel-shaped proteins that help other proteins to fold into their complex three-dimensional shape. Chaperones fold correctly because they have chaperones of their own; other vicious circle for evolutionists.
12. The Atlas Moth has the image of the head of a Cobra (a predatory animal) on each wing. It is absurd nonsense to believe (as evolutionists must) that the accurate images of Cobras on the wings of this moth originated by chance.
13. Cell differentiation required for human development.
14. The origin of the interdependent body systems:
a) The cardiovascular system is dependent on the renal system, the lymphatic system, the respiratory system, the muscular system, the nervous system, the skeletal system and the digestive system.
b) The digestive system is dependent on the cardiovascular system, the lymphatic system, the nervous system and the muscular system.
c) The reproductive system is dependent on the endocrine system, the nervous system, the cardiovascular system and the integumentary system.
d) The muscular system is dependent on the cardiovascular system and the nervous system.
e) The nervous system is dependent on the cardiovascular system, the cardiovascular system is dependent on the respiratory system and the respiratory system is dependent on the nervous system.
f) The lymphatic system is dependent on the skeletal system, the cardiovascular system and the cardiovascular system is dependent on the lymphatic system.
g) The skeletal system is dependent on the cardiovascular system and the cardiovascular system is dependent on the skeletal system.

or does the book simply ignore these problems and attempt to give the reader the impression that these unanswerable problems for evolutionary theory simply don't exist?

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 15, 2007 4:52:41 PM PDT
God says:
Since ID claims that nature cannot self-organize OR create complexity, the chapter is a well deserved one.
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