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123 of 143 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars well, maybe it's not so bad, June 23, 2003
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This review is from: Spirituality for the Skeptic: The Thoughtful Love of Life (Hardcover)
I was a philosophy student for five semesters, sincerely (and naively) searching for truth and wisdom. I nearly completed the major before I just got tired of its irrelevance. Solomon nicely summed up my experience, "What had originally been conceived as the love of wisdom had become a tedious technical enterprise, appealing more to students with affective disorders than to those who were seeking the meaning of life." With such disappointment in the background, I looked forward to recovering a bit of enthusiasm for Western philosophy, to receiving a bit of its wisdom for my life, for my skeptical spirituality.
After reading the preface and introduction to this book on Amazon, I ordered it. I had high expectations. I wanted to see a professional, thoughtful philosopher apply insights from the Western philosophical tradition to the problems of spirituality for skeptics: the meaning of life in light of evolutionary psychology and physical cosmology, ethics without authorities, ritual and worship and wholeness in the emerging skeptical traditions, belonging and identity and coalition formation in a world of deadly technology.
I am sorry to say that's not what I got, and if that's what you want you'll be as disappointed as I was. He seems to have satisfied himself on such questions long before he encountered spirituality. He is not addressing them in any depth here.
Instead, this book is an apology for spirituality in academia, specifically in the discipline of philosophy. Solomon's project is to address the typical moderately liberal concerns of academia and academic philosophy in terms of spirituality. Essentially he's preoccupied with a terminological (cultural) problem: How can a self-respecting academic discuss spirituality. Isn't it just too trite?
In retrospect, I suppose this is a worthy mission, but it's not one that means much to me. If it's your concern, this book is probably good for you. But if you are interested in the kinds of questions I was interested in, then this book is either irrelevant or superficial.
(I am not sure what Solomon thought his purpose was. He never actually comes out and says, and he seems to think he's discussing deep, meaningful questions throughout the book. And, to be fair, I did pause for thought a few times while reading it. But it's not going to have a lasting impact on me, and he didn't seem concerned that it might. He did seem concerned that he might be misconstrued by a reviewer, so he filled his paragraphs with caveats; obviously he's accustomed to writing for academic journals rather than for a "serious" audience--I mean that literally. Meanwhile, comments throughout the book reveal that his projected audience is familiar with the social scene in Anglo-American academia.)
Let me add two more criticisms. Solomon seeks spirituality in partnership with science, but he really appears unfamiliar with science. Perhaps that's a faulty impression; since he's not really thinking about the meaning of life perhaps he doesn't have to address the problems suggested by science.
Secondly, he appears unfamiliar with anthropology; although he cites and refers to classical philosophers, modern and contemporary Western philosophers, ancient East Asian philosophers, ancient Indian philosophers, and religious traditions from Pacific islands (he wasn't more specific)--he doesn't take any notice of the contexts of all those philosophers. Once again, a charitable reader could imagine that they are beyond the scope of Solomon's project. So they may be. However, he makes a startling claim on the last page, "For most people, the transformation of self may be nothing more than total immersion in a group and a tradition. But for those of us who enjoy the mixed blessing of seeing beyond all traditions and thus finding ourselves without an anchor in the world, spirituality is rather an arduous process, filled with doubts and misgivings, skeptical of glib formulations and platitudes, ...."
Oh my! I submit that Solomon is not seeing beyond all traditions, that actually he is deeply immersed in one, that in fact spirituality in many traditions is an arduous process filled with doubts and misgivings, and that while he is skeptical of certain glib formulations and platitudes, he is swallowing others hook, line and sinker--and spitting them back up in print. In short, he really ought to read some anthropology.
His other books are probably much better. To be fair, he admits that spirituality is new to him. Perhaps when he is more familiar with the topic, and more comfortable with his right to address it, he can bring his familiarity with philosophy to it in greater depth. If he tries, I would be happy to read his book.
On the bright side, reading the book did inspire me to revisit Sartre, Camus and Heidegger after all this time. Solomon reminded me that they did wrestle with the grand questions I mentioned, and that once upon a time I enjoyed reading their work and thinking about their thoughts and learning from them. I guess that's a meager version of what I wanted after all.
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Showing 1-7 of 7 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Jan 1, 2010 1:47:31 PM PST
Nothing is as easy (natural and simple) as accepting the wisdom (or foolishness, depending on your perspective) of your own traditional background. Every religious writer, regardless of background, has to pay lip service to the difficulty of coming to terms with the traditional religion and beliefs of their community (lest we think they were less than serious), but, at the end of the day, they just accept what they are told: anthropology only shows how prone most human beings in most places (and times, ours included) are to uncritically embracing the inherited tradition (it's always easier - than to not, btw).

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2010 4:32:49 AM PST
Wyote says:
That's true. I believe that there is a moral imperative to fight against that bias within us as much as we can, even though we can never completely succeed.

Posted on Oct 27, 2010 10:19:30 PM PDT
M. R. says:
I'm not sure exactly why specifically you think that Solomon was "unfamiliar with science," but seeing as he got his undergraduate degree in microbiology, I would suggest that he had familiarity with at least its broad strokes.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 3, 2010 9:03:08 AM PDT
Wyote says:
That's interesting; obviously I didn't know that. But that makes it still more interesting that he didn't substantially address it in the book.

Posted on Apr 19, 2011 1:21:22 AM PDT
C. Tofsrud says:
"I wanted to see a professional, thoughtful philosopher apply insights from the Western philosophical tradition to the problems of spirituality for skeptics: the meaning of life in light of evolutionary psychology and physical cosmology, ethics without authorities, ritual and worship and wholeness in the emerging skeptical traditions, belonging and identity and coalition formation in a world of deadly technology."

Thanks for the review. I was hoping to get something similar out of the book as what I've quoted above, and am disappointed that the author didn't address these issues. Out of curiosity, have you managed to find a book that *does* confront these philosophical questions for the skeptically minded?

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 28, 2011 6:28:52 AM PDT
Wyote says:
A little. Owen Flanagan's books such as The Really Hard Problem: Meaning in a Material World (Bradford Books) and The Problem Of The Soul: Two Visions Of Mind And How To Reconcile Them are among the best, for me. But only a start toward that list of issues.

Posted on Jul 25, 2013 9:25:33 PM PDT
Greg says:
Owen Flanagan's latest - Bodhisattva's Brain - may be what you're looking for. The podcast The Partially Examined Life did a nice interview with the author and subsequent discussion of the book.
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