Customer Review

68 of 88 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Best in Bits, November 18, 2007
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This review is from: I Am America (And So Can You!) (Hardcover)
My wife and I having a running debate over which show is better: The Daily Show or The Colbert Report. We both like both shows; however, she's a bigger fan of Colbert whereas I think he was funnier on The Daily Show. (How I miss him on "This Week in God.")

That's not to say Colbert isn't still funny. He is. Very funny. But the conceit of his new show leaves him less space to maneuver and that is reflected in his book.

Essentially, I Am America (and So Can You!) reads like a combination of a book-length "Word" segment from his show (complete with margin comments) and the kind of narcissistic, pseudo-biography/position statement produced ad naseum by politician and TV pundits. The key words here being "book-length."

Reading long passages from this book in one sitting becomes quite tedious, as if the entire half-hour of The Colbert Report had been taken up with one long "Word" segment. However, if you take the book a chapter at a time, it's much easier to be caught up in the funny moments. And there are plenty of them here, including a reprint of Colbert's speech at the White House Correspondents' Dinner.

Don't feel you're doing Stephen disrespect if you take him in chunks. It would be more disrespectful if you gave up on what's here because you got sucked into the vortex of the conceit through which it's written. Stick with it. It's worth the journey.
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Showing 1-5 of 5 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Feb 9, 2008 12:47:01 PM PST
D. Com says:
Colbert is in character. How can "conceit" apply to someone in character?

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 3, 2011 11:11:25 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 3, 2011 11:11:40 AM PST
Suzanne G. says:
Because this commentor is using the literary definition of conceit.
To wit:
2. something that is conceived in the mind; a thought; idea: He jotted down the conceits of his idle hours.
3. imagination; fancy.
4. a fancy; whim; fanciful notion.
5. an elaborate, fanciful metaphor, esp. of a strained or far-fetched nature.
6. the use of such metaphors as a literary characteristic, esp. in poetry.

In reply to an earlier post on May 16, 2012 9:27:36 PM PDT
Jamie Flower says:
How can it not?

Posted on Jul 25, 2012 11:56:26 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 25, 2012 11:56:55 PM PDT
JohnGreenFan says:
Thought I'd add another comment supporting what Suzanne G says. Colbert is using a conceit, as in an extended metaphor. "Conceit" does not equal "conceitedness" (arrogance).

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 4, 2012 10:13:28 PM PST
Wartrukk says:
I did not know that...Thank you for that tidbit.
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Timothy Haugh
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Location: New York, NY United States

Top Reviewer Ranking: 1,203