Industrial-Sized Deals Shop all Back to School Shop Women's Handbags Learn more nav_sap_plcc_6M_fly_beacon Deradoorian $5 Off Fire TV Stick Off to College Essentials Shop Popular Services gotS5 gotS5 gotS5  Amazon Echo Starting at $99 Kindle Voyage Metal Gear Solid 5 Shop Now STEM Toys & Games
Customer Review

28 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Turning Back To Reason, January 1, 2008
This review is from: Turning Back the Clock: Hot Wars and Media Populism (Hardcover)
Nowadays, when most authors writing on social and politcal events or trends are motivated primarily by their partisan agendas, it is a refreshing and enlightening experience to read from someone like Umberto Eco. The acclaimed author of FOUCAULT'S PENDULUM and THE NAME Of The ROSE, who also happens to be the world's only famous medievalist and semiotician, is an endangered species: an original thinker, whose ideas and opinions derive not from organizational or ideological loyalties, but rather originate out of independent observation and evaluation. I may disagree with Eco on more than a few things inside this book (as, for example, his uncharacterically unfair treatment of both Mel Gibson and the PASSION Of The CHRIST in the essay "Hands Off My Son!"), but at least these thoughts are his own.

TURNING BACK The CLOCK: HOT WARS And MEDIA POPULISM is a collection of essays based on a number of Umberto Eco's articles and lectures between 2000-2005. The majority of these pieces originally appeared in the Italian newspapers L'espresso and La Repubblica, they are short, informal, even humorous. They are also, however, very serious in their intent, and are models as to what opinion pieces in journalism should be.

Eco's writing here takes on everything from what he terms paleowar vs. neowar (in the essay "Some Reflections on War and Peace), media monopolism and movies to HARRY POTTER and THE DA VINCI CODE (from "Those Who Don't Believe in God Believe in Everything), from Nigerian beauty pageants (in "Beauty Queens, Fundamentalists and Lepers") to political correctness and multiculturalism to Islamist terrorism and Islamophobia as well.

Within this book's 41 collected essays, instead of bullying or haranguing his readers, Eco offers the commonsense and moderation that was once the hallmark of classic humanism and liberalism: That we need not to abandon all values and all standards in order to achieve a tolerant and pluralistic society.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No

[Add comment]
Post a comment
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Amazon will display this name with all your submissions, including reviews and discussion posts. (Learn more)
Name:
Badge:
This badge will be assigned to you and will appear along with your name.
There was an error. Please try again.
Please see the full guidelines here.

Official Comment

As a representative of this product you can post one Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
The following name and badge will be shown with this comment:
 (edit name)
After clicking the Post button you will be asked to create your public name, which will be shown with all your contributions.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.  Learn more
Otherwise, you can still post a regular comment on this review.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
 
System timed out

We were unable to verify whether you represent the product. Please try again later, or retry now. Otherwise you can post a regular comment.

Since you previously posted an Official Comment, this comment will appear in the comment section below. You also have the option to edit your Official Comment.   Learn more
The maximum number of Official Comments have been posted. This comment will appear in the comment section below.   Learn more
Prompts for sign-in
 

Comments


Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-10 of 10 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Jan 3, 2008 5:34:17 PM PST
Intresting reflections on a very intriguing thinker. Your review really arouses my interest in this book, and that's an indicator of a fine review.

Posted on Jan 4, 2008 1:40:19 AM PST
H. Schneider says:
Thanks for suggesting the book, Caesar.
H.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 6, 2008 9:42:40 PM PST
If you are a fan of the man's novels, or appreciate any of his earlier essays, you will not be disappointed with this volume. Thanks guys for taking the time out for my reviews.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 7, 2008 1:39:06 AM PST
H. Schneider says:
I loved the Name of the Rose, was still with him in the Pendulum, but then he lost me, novel-wise. Will have a look at the essays.
H

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 8, 2008 9:14:25 AM PST
I didn't much care for the novel BAUDOLINO.

Posted on Jan 9, 2008 4:53:35 AM PST
[Deleted by Amazon on May 5, 2008 2:28:02 PM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 22, 2008 7:22:35 PM PST
I can only echo Mr. Hedge's comment.

Posted on Sep 19, 2008 9:19:27 PM PDT
Winston says:
just got this book in paperback. seems like a fair book though I dont agree with some of the stuff I have seen so far.

Posted on Sep 20, 2008 5:06:58 PM PDT
Reviewer says:
Well Caesar, you've convinced me to read Eco on the basis of your most specific observation, that he is hard on Mel Gibson's Passion. I need to read that.

Posted on Aug 21, 2011 9:08:40 AM PDT
Excellent review. Thanks for writing and posting it.
‹ Previous 1 Next ›

Review Details

Item

Reviewer


Location: Aldan, PA United States

Top Reviewer Ranking: 372,483