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Customer Review

117 of 122 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Lot Good, And Some Bad, June 3, 2011
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This little candle lantern has a lot of good, and some bad going for it. I think the good outweighs the bad by a considerable margin, so I gave it four stars. I'm not sure why there is such a price difference between the different colors, but I bought the silver aluminum one because it was the cheapest.

The good:
* Compact, and collapsible. This is a light source that will give you long lasting light in a tiny package (when collapsed) that is about 3/4 the size of a normal can of pop.
* As the candle burns, an internal spring automatically pushes the candle up. This is nice since it means that you won't have to twiddle with the candle as it burns.
* The glass shield is nice, and I have no worries about it protecting the flame from wind. If dropped, there is almost no risk that the candle will light anything in the house on fire.

The bad:
* Cheap metal. I mean super cheap metal. I'm no Hercules, but I think I could probably mash in the base with my bare hands. Since I pretty much only plan to use it in the event of an extended power outage, I can overlook this bad point.
* It only works on UCO candles. UCO candles are kinda short and squat, and I've never seen any candles in any store shaped like them. So, if you're going to use these candle lanterns for your "Go Dark Bag," then I suggest that you stock up on UCO candles. This is not a big deal for me as the UCO candles are made to burn longer and I'd buy them anyway.

I bought one UCO Candle Lantern for the "Go Dark Bag." I'm kinda-sorta up in the air as to whether or not I'll buy another one. I probably will since it would be nice to have two candle light sources in the event of an extended power outage.

EDIT - I just noticed that this little bad boy is MADE IN THE USA. What's funny is that I've stopped even looking for the MADE IN THE USA label, and as I was unscrewing the candle mount there it was -- MADE IN THE USA. Anything MADE IN THE USA automatically scores at least one kudos point. So, that makes this a FIVE STAR product.
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Showing 1-10 of 11 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Dec 20, 2011 6:00:48 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 20, 2011 6:01:35 AM PST
I don't understand why you list UCO only candles under the bad column but you also say it's not a big deal to you. You also state, "* Cheap metal. I mean super cheap metal. I'm no Hercules, but I think I could probably mash in the base with my bare hands. Since I pretty much only plan to use it in the event of an extended power outage, I can overlook this bad point." Soooooo.... did it crush or not. Had mine for almost 20 years now and it's not even dented. (see my review for how much I use mine) I appreciate the review but just confused by the bad points you make.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 20, 2011 6:23:10 AM PST
I think that being able to only use one candle type is a bit limiting. During an extended power failure of a few weeks, it's very likely that once my personal stash of UCO candles are gone that I'll be unable to find another supply locally. The solution, of course, is to stock up.

You've had yours for 20 years? Well, I'm going to guess that the one that was made 20 years ago was of higher quality than what is manufactured in 2011. I just reached into the closet, pulled out my UCO candle lantern, and managed to bend it quite easily. Did it crush? Well, no. But only because I'm not in the habit of crushing things I paid for. Could I crush it? With little effort, I could crush it quite easily.

Posted on Jul 27, 2012 11:14:05 AM PDT
Al says:
Win' and Sean,
I totally agree, anything made in the USA is getting scarce. I try to buy made here but it is getting harder all the time. The fact that Sean has one made 20 years ago and is still useable proves they are pretty good and it was probably made sturdier back then. Simplier means less to break or wear out. I've used one of these for a few years while camping and I like them for light and as a bug repellent with the citronella candles. BTW, I have trimmed away a little bit from small ordinary household candles and used them but stocking up is best practive. It was a lot of work to pare them down.
Allen

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 21, 2012 10:05:35 PM PDT
D.L. says:
If you've had your lantern for 20 yrs...that explains a lot...they're really cheaply made now, unfortunately.

Posted on Oct 22, 2012 11:12:42 PM PDT
BH says:
I think the metal is thin to keep the weight at a minimum, for people who carry it in their backpack for use in tents.

Posted on Jan 1, 2013 4:59:52 PM PST
musicmonster says:
if there is one redeeming feature about this, its the heat it can produce, more than a LED light would. keeps the condensation away in tents, dried my boots without worry of melting and can bring 6oz of water to 170, perched on top of the chimney. if you are prepping rope and need to melt the ends, or need to start a stove or a fire, save your firesteel and matches for when you really need it. there are a lot of farmers market honey producers that are selling beeswax candles in the uco size now and you can pick them up for about half the uco cost. on backcountry trips i've been amazed at the number of times i've whipped this out instead of the stove or flashlight, more reliable than a bic below freezing.

Posted on Mar 25, 2014 1:40:23 PM PDT
david says:
I have used candles in power outages.

by choice, we (wife and I) use oil lanterns. They light easy and give of a lot of light, enough to play cards with or read and with 5-7 wick fed oil lanterns, they give off quite a bit of heat as well as a lot of light.

These then give me time to light Coleman lanterns and then we're the only house with light shinning our our windows.

Wicks last a long time and burn clean as long as you keep them trimmed. The oil is easy to get.
There is a plus with wick fed oil lanterns - can put in Citronella oil. so not only do you have light at camp sight but also get rid of pesky insects.
Oil Lanterns are also great for going to the potty room at camp sites.

I can however see that a candle lantern might be a nice night light in a tent.

But after reading a lot of reviews, I am not convinced it is worth buying a Candle lantern.

Posted on Sep 9, 2014 8:17:27 AM PDT
D. Williams says:
You mention poor build quality, but you give it a point for being made in the USA? This seems contradictory.

Posted on Jun 25, 2015 5:42:10 PM PDT
I noticed a lot of people dinging this item for being cheaply made with cheap metal. DH is right these lanterns are used by a lot of backpackers and weight is critical. It is thin metal on purpose because if it was built sturdier and weighed 2 lbs instead of 8oz. most of us wouldn't be carrying it on our backs :)

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 3, 2015 3:33:53 PM PDT
Thank you.
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