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Customer Review

68 of 74 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The magic of Fellini, August 26, 2000
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This review is from: Amarcord (The Criterion Collection) (DVD)
Fellini's theme of coming of age memoir works as a beautiful nostalgic piece. The film resonates from an earlier film of his 8 1/2 showing the director's flashes to his seaside hometown. I've watched this film several times and on every occassion find something new. Here's a tip to enjoy watching a foreign film - Do NOT watch the English dubbed version if there is any - so much is lost in the film. Fellini's films work with subtitles because they make you forget you're reading them at all and as always, Fellini pleases both eye and ear and subsequently the heart. The musical score by Nino Rota is something one looks forward to in every scene. His music perfectly sets the tempo of each image, and I mean each and every one. What a duo of artistic genius these two men are! Watching the film on its excellent Criterion-restored DVD version, one can only wonder what the cinema world would be without Fellini.
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Showing 1-2 of 2 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Nov 13, 2006 2:39:37 PM PST
I agree that Amarcord is a lovely film, if a little surreal (most all of Fellini's films seemed to exist just beyond the realm of what could be considered normal); I rented this from Netflix and remember, during the scenes with the family arguing, my mother-in-law saying how close to home this film struck for her. (She comes from a big Italian-American Catholic family and insists that drama and high dudgeon are pretty much the norm; note the mother yelling "Oh my God, I'm going to kill myself! I'm going to kill myself!") Additionally, I would recommend Cinema Paradiso--not Fellini, but also a film about coming of age in Italy around the World War II period. Cinema Paradiso is heartbreaking; I watched the scene with the film's young protagonist just missing his teenage girlfriend and was in tears, felt his sense of rage and betrayal at their reunion 30 years later and her pain when she explained that her father had kept her away from him. While I don't find Amarcord to be so heart-wrenching, I do find it a bit more upbeat than Cinema Paradiso, but I would also say that, thematically, the two films are of a piece and should be watched back-to-back.

Posted on Jan 1, 2011 8:17:01 PM PST
Miko wrote: "Here's a tip to enjoy watching a foreign film - Do NOT watch the English dubbed version if there is any - so much is lost in the film. Fellini's films work with subtitles because they make you forget you're reading them at all" but in the case of "Amarcord" this would be a mistake. Unless you speak Italian, you'll miss 2/3 of the dialog if you rely on the subtitles. Only the lead character's speech is subtitled. In "Amarcord" more than most, there is a lot going on in the background, which the English dubbed version faithfully captures (but the subtitles do not).
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