Customer Review

90 of 101 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting but not overly useful, January 17, 2010
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This review is from: SE MT908 11 Function Credit Card Size Survival Pocket Tool (Tools & Home Improvement)
Interesting multi-purpose gadget but it's not as useful as the "11 functions" would have you believe. First, item #11 is the keychain hole but if you attach the device to your keys and throw them in your pocket, you're going to cut your leg since the other side is a cutting blade. At the very least, you're going to have to repair the hole in your pocket. Next, Item #9 is a "Direction Anxillary Wrench". I've googled this and came up empty, with the exception of hits on this device itself. If google doesn't know how to use it, I certainly can't be expected to. So, we're down to 9 useful gadgets from the 11. Next, the "butterfly screw wrench".... I guess it would work but I personally don't see butterfly screws all that often and more importantly, aren't butterfly screws specifically designed to NOT need a tool?

Without actually testing on everything, the other tools seem generally more useable. Can and bottle openers seem ok and the knife seems sharp enough to cut something (hence, don't just attach to your keys and throw in your pocket! OUCH!). Saw seems like it'd cut in a pinch & it's hard to mess up a ruler even though it is in centimeters, not inches like you might expect. Seems like it'd be a bit akward using the 2 wrenches (the 2 multi-sized wrenches count as 2 of your eleven btw whereas it could be argued to be 1 function) but without actual testing I can't be certain.

Anyway, in summary it's an interesting gadget made from a single piece of metal. However, the useful functionality isn't as high as I'd hoped. More impressive in looks than functionality.
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Tracked by 1 customer

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Showing 1-7 of 7 posts in this discussion
Initial post: May 3, 2010 12:31:11 PM PDT
M. Carroll says:
They meant Auxilliary, not Anxillary.

Posted on Sep 20, 2010 7:43:09 AM PDT
ringobob says:
For the "Direction Anxillary Wrench", from http://www.heezy.com/products.html (way down at the bottom):

"While it may seem implausible, you can actually create a compass by rubbing wire,paperclip or a pin through
your hair, despite the fact that your hair is not magnetic and the normal magnetizing procedure involves
rubbing metal against a magnet. To use you need to place the tool on a flat surface on the plastic sleeve
that it comes with. Place a couple drops of water in the Orientation Direction Indicator to make level with the
surface of the tool. Place the magnetized hair-rubbed wire slowly on the water or on a small leaf if it wont
float on the waters surface tension. It should slowly align north/south."

I haven't tried it, but the feature is called "Direction Ancillary Indication" on those layouts, and since all of those are actually real words, it seems plausible that that is the more accurate name.

Posted on Feb 27, 2011 8:36:34 PM PST
J. Nuno says:
I love your review, it had me laughing harder than I've laughed in a long time. Thanks.

Posted on Jul 22, 2011 11:49:01 AM PDT
Direction Ancillary Indicator: It is a simple tool, mainly used in the outdoors, that tells direction.

Many come on a multi-tool. It's a circular hole through in a flat piece of a hard material like steel, titanium, plastic..etc, with increments etched around it's edge.

1.You place this flat on a flat surface.
2. You drop a few drops of water in its center.
3. Magnetize a very light piece of metal, so that it will float on the surface tension of the water. This can be done by a magnet, but you can also magnetize it by rubbing it on your hair.
4. Lay shaving, pin..etc. on top of water.
5. Result should be the ends pointing true north and south.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 14, 2011 8:23:18 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Sep 14, 2011 8:57:16 PM PDT
Brimstone says:
Maybe it's very clever Chinglish. Maybe it's a portmanteau incorporating 'Ancillary' and 'Auxiliary'.

Maybe I think too much.

In any case I'm feelin' charitable so I'm gonna give you young Dan'l Boone's a little o' the old timer's know-how about making the "Direction Anxillary Wrench" into somethin' useful that you can use to unscrew yourself if you get lost.

Take one of those magnetic business cards, you know, like the ones every real estate agent gives out to stick on your fridge so in case you have a real estate emergency you have the number handy. Cut off about a two millimeter strip from the short end. Now cut this strip to a length equal to about 2/3 the diameter of the dang hole with the graduations. Wrap this strip in a teeny tiny piece of duck tape (no, not duct tape) so's now it floats on water. Now float the thing in some water. One end should be pointing North and one end south. Put an arrow on the North end with a red marker, and a big letter 'N'. Now take the rest of that duct tape and cut a little piece to cover one side of the graduated hole. Put you compass needle in there and cover the other side of the hole with more duct tape.

Now you have and emergency compass. Furthermore you can pick it up and use it rather than hold it against the tool cover. If you don't have water handy, spit or pee in the hole to float your needle. But don;t bleed in it; the iron in your blood will screw things up.

And if the dang thing don't work, or (more likely) you have no idea which direction you need to go even though you now know where North is, at least you got two pieces of duck tape to make band-aids for the blister's you'll get from walkin' in circles.

Yes, I know, I'm a genius. Now would someone please tell that to my wife?!

Posted on May 13, 2013 5:14:24 AM PDT
John Bean says:
Well you could give a lot of people a garage full of tools and they couldn't do anything with them. LOL For $1.10 price I'm sure it's a great bargain.

Posted on Jan 25, 2014 3:01:05 PM PST
Stef says:
The ancillary direction thingie reminds me of how I learned to tell direction with an analog watch as a scout. Since digital watches are now prevalent I figured you would just have to picture the hands of the clock inside the circle and take it from there.
http://www.wikihow.com/Use-an-Analog-Watch-as-a-Compass
And THANK you for the visual with the keychain/knife. L.O.L.
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