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185 of 205 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Reading This Book Should be One of the Requirements of Life, October 7, 2009
This review is from: Have a Little Faith: A True Story (Hardcover)
This is one of the only books that I've ever read that I couldn't put down! Really! If it had not been for the normal demands of life I would have finished it in one sitting. Instead, I had to put it down for an evening and spend the next day waiting to be able to get my hands on it to finish it. Mitch Albom is blessed with an incredible ability to capture thoughts and stories that touch the soul. Have a Little Faith is one of the books that should be required reading for life; particularly now with so much going on in the world around us. His conversations with two great, yet unknown, men of God are lessons in how to deal with the normal challenges and struggles of life. Don't read this book if you're afraid to feel the urge to shed a few tears of joys but read this book if you want to understand the answers to the questions that you ponder daily from the perspective of two men who have answered them from paths of life that, although divergent, were filled with experiences that captured the essence of what life is all about.
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Tracked by 3 customers

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Showing 1-10 of 21 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Oct 28, 2009 7:34:11 AM PDT
It is a curious thing that so many people need to have faith in entities other than themselves. I have often wondered if that external entity faith is an emotional necessity because of inability to cope with an uncertain and often difficult world. How about believing in yourself? Or is it that you feel incompetent to handle life? Do you believe yourself to be so weak that you cannot handle misfortune, pain, grief? You decide the answers to these questions.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 29, 2009 9:47:21 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 29, 2009 9:47:49 PM PDT
Jase says:
@Luis: From a professor, this is such terrible logic. What you're suggesting is, 'IF people have faith in (a) God, THEN they can't have faith in themselves'. It shouldn't take you too long to see how flawed this is...You've also woven in there that people NEED to have that faith rather than CHOOSE to. People like you have such a strong anti-faith position that you lose sight of the fact that YOUR position becomes a ideology, a religion of sorts. Wake up to yourself.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 30, 2009 8:50:36 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 30, 2009 8:56:12 AM PDT
Jase:

This area of Amazon isn't intended for a secular/progressive discussion about God but for people to post comments about the books that they've read. From that perspective I think your post is inappropriate. Also, you've taken some "liberties" with Luis' comments and implied things that Luis didn't state. For example, Luis didn't use the word "God" once in the comments.

Your post seems to be here to convey what I think are your atheist views there there is no God or that we don't need God in our lives. The question of whether we do is a personal decision that we all make in our own private ways. If Luis feels that a God influence is needed and that they found comfort from the words of Albert Lewis and Mitch Albom then they should feel free to post their feelings without being attacked.

I think the looming question to me is whether you've even read the book? Certainly, as a professor you would have read all the words before commenting. If you did, or if you had, you would have realized that Mitch Albom doesn't project any form of a particular faith in the book: just faith. I think the fact that he chose two religious characters to highlight and one is a christian and one Jewish shows some form of universality. In his book he describes some of the beautiful rituals of the Buddhist faith as well.

Why do you hate God and spirituality so much? In the end, Luis was giving their opinions and it wasn't a place to be attacked for them. You can disagree with their feelings about a book (if you've in fact read it...) but to go after their personal feelings about faith is in my opinion way out of line.

I'll leave my comments with a quote from the movie "Secondhand Lions";

"Sometimes the things that may or may not be true are the things a man needs to believe in the most. That people are basically good; that honor, courage, and virtue mean everything; that power and money, money and power mean nothing; that good always triumphs over evil; and I want you to remember this, that love... true love never dies. You remember that, boy. You remember that. Doesn't matter if it's true or not. You see, a man should believe in those things, because those are the things worth believing in. "

Hub McCann, character in movie "Secondhand Lions" (portrayed by Robert DuVall)

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 30, 2009 8:59:17 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 30, 2009 9:10:24 AM PDT
Hola Jase: I do not suggest any such thing. I place the burden on each person to decide what to believe. I find it sad that many people need God or gods in order to deal with an uncertain and at times very difficult world, when they can achieve greater good, happiness (success?) by focusing on what they have and what they can do. Many believers have voiced the old adage, "God helps those who help themselves." I place the emphasis on "themselves" and you perhaps emphasize God. If you are a better human being by your belief in and emphasis on God, more power to you. If so, I will support your belief and applaud you. If you shirk your responsibilities and rely on God to rescue you, you may very well not be a worthy person. It is your decision. You choose. As for myself, I do not need God or gods for anything. I am not an atheist, I am an agnostic, in the original meaning of the word by Huxley. My "religion" is the Golden Rule, which antedates Christianity by several centuries.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 30, 2009 3:34:07 PM PDT
Jase says:
Edward, I was doing the exact opposite. I felt that Luis was attacking people of faith, and a little research later, realized that he was a professor whose (at least public) reading preferences meant his comment on your review didn't come from a reading of the book, but from his underlying preferences regarding faith. I was merely responding to that.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 31, 2009 3:01:08 AM PDT
Hola Jase and Edward: So that I am not misunderstood I call myself "ignorant", which is what Huxley meant when he coined the word agnostic. I am not against others believing in a God (e.g.,Christians, Jews, Muslims) or gods (e.g.,Hinduism). Besides following the Golden Rule (in the negative version, "Do not do unto others..etc.") I also subscribe to a little known comment by Einstein, "If we do good for fear of punishment and expect a reward, we are a sorry lot indeed." It might interest Edward to know, if he does not know, that there are some Mathematical grounds to espouse precisely what his quotation says. I mean Kurt Gödel's work on Incompleteness and on Undecidable Propositions. The best to you all.

Posted on Nov 22, 2009 3:31:32 AM PST
R. Chesly says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 22, 2009 10:07:09 AM PST
Hola Chesly: Although stated in very strong language you, of course, are right. In order to be fair one should recognize that there is no evidence also for the non-existence of a God or gods. One final point: Belief in God or gods seems to be an emotional need for many people. That was recognized by psychologists many years ago. It was one of our earlier psychologists, William James, that stated "Belief in God is justified if it produces a positive effect on the believer." I would like to add to that: "If your belief in God or gods makes you a better, happier person, and if that belief also allows you to be kind and considerate with others, I will support your belief and applaud your actions." That being said, many of us need not have that emotional need mentioned earlier in order to be productive and follow the Golden Rule. I think our method is better but I will not try to impose it on others. Why? Because it does not work for others. Happy Thanksgiving, Merry X-mas, and all that.

Luis A. Veguilla-Berdecia, Ph.D.
Professor of Chemistry

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 24, 2009 12:15:27 PM PST
Miranda Lou says:
Am I missing something? Luis A. sounds like someone told him that he was going to be forced to read this book.
Or was he using this as a forum. I thought this was for book reviews.
Like I said, did I miss something?

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 24, 2009 12:55:39 PM PST
Hola Book Lover: No one has told me that I should read the book although I am familiar with its contents. No, I do not want to use this space as a forum. My apologies if my intentions were not clear. Simply put, I want all my students and all others that like to read to use their brain as well as their "hearts" in all matters of importance.

Luis A. Veguilla-Berdecia, Ph.D.
Professor of Chemistry
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