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Customer Review

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars No Examples , No Answers, No Hints, November 20, 2006
This review is from: Languages and Machines: An Introduction to the Theory of Computer Science (3rd Edition) (Paperback)
Besides the fact that the book is "dry", in which most Math theory based books are, the examples are just the basis step towards solving a problem. I equate it to teaching a child how to add, and just giving them the example "1 + 0", then assume they can figure out the rest. There are no answers, either in the back of the book for particular exercies, nor was a study guide made available. What is really shocking is that it's the most expensive book out there! Not to mention that there isn't any programming steps made available. Great text for a Math major ... horrible textbook for Computer Science Majors, mainly because computer science majors would want to see programming examples and may not be as strongly math oriented as a Math major would be.
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Showing 1-1 of 1 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Sep 1, 2015 8:31:00 AM PDT
S. Funk says:
I have taught using this book several times, and it is my favorite book on the subject that I've seen so far. I'm not sure what this reviewer means by "no examples." One of the reasons I like this book so much is that it has so many useful examples within the text. There are no homework solutions in the text, but they are available to instructors upon request. I am very sorry that Pearson has decided to make this book be print-on-demand, which makes it more expensive for my students and means my department needs to pay for desk copies for instructional purposes. I'm now looking into other books for that reason. If this book was kept in print, I'd definitely stick with it for my text when I teach Theory of Computation.
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