Customer Review

11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant!, May 19, 2014
This review is from: Upside Down Mountain (Audio CD)
An essential addition to the discography of Conor Oberst. Many of the songs on Upside Down Mountain were honed on the road over the last two years. Several of the songs such as "You Are Your Mothers Child," "Kick." "Common Knowledge," and "Lake at Night Unknown" may be familiar to most Oberst fans, yet each of those songs on Upside Down Mountain are newly recorded for this release. Over the years Conor Oberst has written some of the most inspiring songs and words that I have ever heard. This album is no exception. Each song becomes its own story that seems to come more alive with each listen. Not counting the previously mentioned four songs, "Desert Island Questionairre" has become my favorite track. It gives the listener a bit of a dark glimpse at the selfishness and destruction around us. The female backup vocals by his wife give a raw heartfelt emotion to the urgency of the song. There is a video online where at the end of the song, Conor says "that song was dark even for me." It's truly a great song. "Artifact #1" is a soft, hushing, ballad that moves you along through the tale of love, love lost and compromise. There is not one song on here that I wouldn't rave about. In the end, as I stated earlier this is truly an essential addition to your Conor Oberst collection.
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Showing 1-2 of 2 posts in this discussion
Initial post: May 25, 2014 8:51:49 AM PDT
M. Northuis says:
"The Peoples key" was in my estimation the most boring, shallow album of CO that I have
in my collection while "Cassadega" (SP?) is one of his most brilliant. From the clips I have
heard of this "UM" album I feel this is closer to "TPK" than "Cassadega", It would be helpful if you would elaborate a bit more on how this album measures up to previous
outings. I will probably buy this album but if it is as slick & poppy as "TPK" I will not be a happy camper van beethoven.

In reply to an earlier post on May 29, 2014 12:04:20 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 6, 2014 12:16:36 PM PDT
It would be difficult for me to compare it to previous material. I'm not sure comparing it to anything under the Bright Eyes label would be fair. There is no Mike Mogis and Nate Walcott is on one track. So to me, it seems vastly different. I'm sorry to any that may be offended, but Dawes makes me want to take a time machine back to the day I had never heard them. I cannot tolerate Dawes.Anyway I digress, the album doesn't sound like Bright Eyes, it seems a very calculated push towards a more marketable and mature Conor Oberst. Not that it's a bad thing, I enjoy the old stuff and I enjoy this stuff. I just think the album could be a bit foreign to anyone who was hoping for a return to "Lifted" or "Fevers" era Conor. I really think if you give it a chance you might enjoy it, save for the Dawes stuff I mentioned.
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