Professional restaurant supplies Spring Reading 2016 Amazon Fashion Learn more nav_sap_cbcc_7_fly_beacon $5 Albums Fire TV Stick Made in Italy Amazon Gift Card Offer out2 out2 out2  Amazon Echo  Echo Dot  Amazon Tap  Echo Dot  Amazon Tap  Amazon Echo Introducing new colors Kindle Paperwhite Shop Now SnS
Customer Review

162 of 174 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Exactly what I wanted, November 21, 2007
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Kingston DataTraveler I - 4 GB USB 2.0 Flash Drive DTI/4GB (Personal Computers)
This thumb drive is exactly what I wanted. Cheap, reliable, and without some kind of vendor supplied crapware that automatically runs when you insert the drive.

I use truecrypt for creating/using an encrypted partition. Works fine, but one word of warning. Format the encrypted partition as FAT. An NTFS partition running on a thumb drive can have dismount issues. Eventually, those issues will trash the partition.

I've run this drive for a month now and it has been fine even though it bangs around in a pocket with phone, knife, change, etc. A corsair drive failed after a few days of this treatment.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No

[Add comment]
Post a comment
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Amazon will display this name with all your submissions, including reviews and discussion posts. (Learn more)
Name:
Badge:
This badge will be assigned to you and will appear along with your name.
There was an error. Please try again.
Please see the full guidelines here.

Official Comment

As a representative of this product you can post one Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
The following name and badge will be shown with this comment:
 (edit name)
After clicking the Post button you will be asked to create your public name, which will be shown with all your contributions.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.  Learn more
Otherwise, you can still post a regular comment on this review.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
 
System timed out

We were unable to verify whether you represent the product. Please try again later, or retry now. Otherwise you can post a regular comment.

Since you previously posted an Official Comment, this comment will appear in the comment section below. You also have the option to edit your Official Comment.   Learn more
The maximum number of Official Comments have been posted. This comment will appear in the comment section below.   Learn more
Prompts for sign-in
  [Cancel]

Comments

Track comments by e-mail

Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-6 of 6 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Jan 12, 2008 5:43:08 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 12, 2008 5:45:21 PM PST
Ron B. says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

Posted on May 15, 2008 5:50:37 AM PDT
DryPhi says:
I am interested in hearing more about how "An NTFS partition running on a thumb drive can have dismount issues [that] will trash the partition".
Is this true if one would always go to My Computer - Disconnect to remove the drive? Is FAT more reliable for the forgetful user?

Posted on May 30, 2008 11:04:03 PM PDT
G. Smukal says:
I am not an expert, but just by using Windows Explorer, I found that the 4 GB drive uses FAT32, whereas drives 2 GB and smaller use FAT16. Perhaps it is possible to over-ride the native structure of the drive with NTFS, but I doubt it, and it really is not necessary. FAT32 utilizes its space well - a 1 KB GIF takes 4 KB on it, but a FAT16 2GB drive uses 32 KB for the same image.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 21, 2008 12:35:42 PM PDT
Tyler Forge says:
Yes, it's the forgetful user issue that got me. Yanking without dismounting, turning off the computer at the wrong time, that kind of stuff.

More recently, I've seen a formatting option to treat the drive as removable. This might make NTFS OK for us forgetful folk. Dunno. Haven't tested it.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 24, 2009 4:20:16 PM PDT
There is a setting in the device manager for removable drives so you don't need to do the removal. Of course, you still don't want to remove it while it's being written to, so it doesn't hurt to dismount it if you can remember.

Posted on Aug 18, 2009 6:11:49 PM PDT
Mark Baum says:
Ah, a fellow TrueCrypt.org user! I figure any unencrypted flash drive is fair game so I did some experimenting.

My 4GB purple Kingston was wiped/formatted with TrueCrypt.org and converted to a mountable compressed NTFS host. I've been using it quite a lot and am always careful to first close any programs accessing the drive, dismount through TrueCrypt.org then click the "safe remove" icon in the system tray. So far I've had no problems. And certainly some users may think that's a lot of work just to remove the drive but I value my drive and its data (that's why it's encrypted).

For the usual "churn and burn" stuff I have a cheap 2GB Kingston DataTraveller which is both unencrypted and doesn't contain sensitive data. Most of the time I use that to exchange files from computers that don't host any type of encryption. I simply copy the files from it to the encrypted 4GB then wipe the files on the 2GB drive afterwards, although I feel that file wiping with wear-leveling technology may be counterproductive.

Y'know, in all honesty, I really don't know of many users that use crypto on their flash drives. You'd think that as the capacities grow larger and larger the mere instance of data loss through misplacing of the drive and having someone find all of that data in the clear would be a dire security concern. Even DVD and CD recordable media can have crypto applied to it for data security (that's my next experiment: Throwing some data into a TrueCrypt.org container file then burning that file to disc).

I'd rather have my portable hardware and media be as useful as a piece of unreadable plastic to outsiders.
‹ Previous 1 Next ›