Customer Review

117 of 128 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not The Best, February 8, 2010
This review is from: The Presentation Secrets of Steve Jobs: How to Be Insanely Great in Front of Any Audience (Hardcover)
If you haven't read Presentation Zen, slide:ology and/or Brain Rules, then maybe you will find some interesting bits in this book. I can't complain about the messages in this book - everyone needs to learn how to be a better presenter. But like many business books, the twelve rules here could have been done in a long article instead of a short book. Then at least the author could have embedded video. There's a lot of fluff or irrelevant content (pictures of Jobs, tables of talk transcripts) that do little but pad the book. I'm a big Apple fan, but large parts of this book reads more like a Jobs love-fest than a presentation how-to.

Steve has a luxury most don't: he controls everything about his presentations and has the resources to present in the manner he finds will best get his message across. The vast majority of us do not have those luxuries. While there are a lot of great rules in the book, unless you are presenting something that is highly visual and have the artistic resources to procure vivid imagery, a lot of the particulars of the keynote's will be irrelevant.

There are simply better books on this topic elsewhere.
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Showing 1-2 of 2 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Aug 28, 2010 2:19:44 AM PDT
I agree with most of you said.
The author looks like someone who is such an admirer of Steve Jobs, that he loses his objectivity.
The author misses to analyze the relationship of Jobs with Apple, and go on to idolize all ideas and phrases that Jobs says to build his public image, forgetting that he is a public person who cares so much about his image that is hard to know the real Jobs.

Posted on Oct 24, 2011 12:37:41 PM PDT
Stephen says:
Totally agree. The problem is, so many business presentations aren't fluffy, grandiose, epic events, but rather litanies of charts, spreadsheets, etc. -- none of which can be sacrificed for the sake of the meeting. In cases like this, "five words per page"-type rules are just not applicable. I think this book is really for higher-level presentations, perhaps to larger groups by senior executives, rather than day-to-day intra-group reports.
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