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268 of 286 people found the following review helpful
on January 29, 2000
If you are a high school student, then this calculator is for you. It has everything you need, for algebra, precalculus, and calculus. The good thing about the 83+ is that it is upgradable, so the need for a new calculator doesn't arise, every few years. Purchasing a graph-link can add on a TREMENDOUS amount of programs to use for Physics, Geometry, and even 3D-Graphs, (previously only on the ti-89 and up). If you are in High School, do NOT get the ti-92 or ti-89, because they will probably be banned from standardized tests, and high math classes, so ask your math teacher, because they are too hard to use and understand. Also, these 2 calculators are aimed for more college-level students, so if you are in college, try the ti-89. But in every case, a ti-83+ is ideal!
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169 of 179 people found the following review helpful
on February 14, 2002
Texas Instruments produces some of the most popular and well known graphing calculators in the industry. The TI-83 plus can do most any math problem found in Algebra I, Geometry, and even some Algebra II/Trigonometry. The wide screen allows for graphing equations and multi-line functions.
The graphing capabilities of the TI-83+ are a superb choice for Algebra I classes. The ability to automatically find intersections and a variety of other important components of a graph are only key presses away.
The calculator has a powerful matrix editor allowing for easy multiplication, addition, and subtraction of matrices. Division of matrices is not possible. The list editor allows for statistical analysis of data both numerically and graphically. Graphically, the 83+ can plot data in several different formats.
Anyone who is familiar with the BASIC computer language can program the TI-83+ with ease. The calculator supports the use of almost every function through a program. Programs can be typed directly into the calculator, or on a computer. The TI-83+ also supports a special form of programs called Flash Applications. Flash Applications are generally quite complex, and are written in a special language on the computer.
The manual included with the calculator is superb. It goes into detail on every single option the calculator supports. Every section includes a Quick Start tutorial that provides an practical example covering many of the chapter's topics. Learning to program in TI-BASIC, the programming language of the calculator is possible through reading the entire manual and following the examples.
The TI Graph Link cable is the interface between a computer (PC or Mac) and any TI Calculator with a link port. It comes in several variations depending on what kind of computer it will be hooked to. The cable is not included with the calculator, but can be purchased as an option. The TI-83+ Silver Edition includes a Black Link cable for Windows PCs.
When the TI-83+ is outgrown, upgrading the TI-89 will require little work for anyone who has gained experience with TI's entry level graphing calculator. The TI-89 has the capability to do Calculus and 3-Dimensional graphs primarily.
Overall, the 83+ is an excellent choice for anyone taking an Algebra course or any math class above that. The calculator does basic arithmetic, graphic, statistics, matrices, and a variety of other mathematical operations.
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186 of 198 people found the following review helpful
on January 3, 2000
Why would I want a TI 83 you may ask? What about the 89? It's a higher model, and has more buttons! Yes, that's exactly it, it has more buttons, and way to many features you won't use. I have a Ti 83+ (More memory than the origional, but same everything else) and it is great! It has built in Financial Apps, which is a nice addition (and helpful!) compared to the 82 (which it is also compatible with!). But the 89? Even the 85? They take greater than calculus students to even need/use those functions, and they are a much harder to learn calculator. The Calculus teacher at our school says that the 83 will get you all through calculus and most likely beyond college. My calculator, which is really easy to learn, came in handy the first day in Geometry. We had to figure an area of a wierd shape and we only had the co-ordinates, i punched them in, and POW, found the area. If you do get this calculator, a TI-Graph Link is a must, this allows you to download software and updates from TIs website, some software could almost be considered cheating, while others can be games for fun. Unless you want to spend $200 for a TI-92+ (not even allowed by most teachers, it's so powerful), this is THE calculator for you!
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110 of 121 people found the following review helpful
on September 12, 2002
If you are thinking of using this calculator for Algebra, Geometry, basically any straight math, especially Calculus, DON'T. That is not to say it won't work, just that there are better things out there, namely the TI-89. The 89 is somewhat more expensive, but, in my opinion and experience, it is far superior for these applications. A few reasons: easier to get the results from previous entries, support for derivitives and integrals, and the higher resolution looks better and lets you put more on the screen at one time, as well as allowing more symbols. However, if you are planning on using the calculator for Statistics, get the 83, because, for some unknown reason, the TI engineers declined to put ANY suppport for stats on the 89, but the 83 is great at it. I have owned TI calculators for many years, and I have never experienced any quality or production problems with them and have never had any of them break except when treated REALLY badly, such as having very heavy, blunt objects dropped on the screen, and I do tend to use mine pretty hard.
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160 of 183 people found the following review helpful
on July 19, 2010
The Ti-83 is a technological marvel, it is the only electronic device that stays in its original price range no matter how old it gets. These specs aren't just out of date, they're so old that you would expect them to be preceded by the phrase "remember when...."

The Ti-83 Plus came out in 1999. Aside from an extremely small amount of extra flash memory, it's the same as the Ti-83 released in 1996. And the Ti-83 itself is really not much different than the Ti-82 which came out in 1993. But somehow after all this time the price hasn't moved. Seriously, look at the listed specs: 16KB of RAM and "Big 160KB archive space." Are they kidding? That's so out of date that I can't even remember the last time I saw kilobytes used as a unit of measurement.

And talk about an awful, extremely low resolution display. This is the same 96x64 monochrome display from the original Ti-81 released in 1990. Decent displays cost almost nothing now. And it would be helpful to have a basic color display so you could have different colored lines when you mapped more than one function at at the same time.

Where does TI even find suppliers that make components this out of date? Actually, maybe that's why this thing is so expensive. The components are so old that scarcity is a big problem.

How TI has been able to dominate this market by selling extremely overpriced and out of date technology is amazing. The only good thing: if someone is ever trying to convince you that monopolies are good things that will lead to better products, just hold up your TI graphing calculator and you've won the debate.
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49 of 53 people found the following review helpful
on August 7, 2000
As a math teacher, I would highly recommend for $5 more to get the TI-83 Plus. The are essentially the same calculators, except the Plus provides memory that will be worth more than $5 as you put programs on your calculator--a must for physics labs.
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30 of 32 people found the following review helpful
on January 24, 2000
I don't recommend spending $100 on a calculator if you don't really need it. Being a college student taking a Statistics class, I was forced to buy the TI-83. I am very happy with it and the various things you can do with it. If you do buy the TI-83 (which I recommend), you should definitely purchase the Graph-Link cable to go along with it. The cable allows you to download various programs and even some cool games from the Internet.
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51 of 58 people found the following review helpful
on April 26, 2010
Negative 5 stars. Lets be real people, the mere existence of this device is perturbing. It is the one electronic that has evolved absolutely none in 15 years and gone UP in price!! My friend bought one recently in a pinch, he thought it might help him with calculus. I figured it'd have some new chip technology and would graph at a reasonable rate. Both no. So then I downloaded a FREE graphing calculator app on my outdated Android phone. And it's friggin marvelous: instantaneous, intuitive, will do a 3d graph of x=sin(y) (3x faster than the ti does sin(x)) that rotates in full color with ability to pan and zoom on the touchscreen.

I can't even list all the advantages of an android/iPod over the TI's in this space, but what about battery, USB, internet, brightness, 192mb ram.. The TI-83 must be $3 to make by now with it's laughable 32kb!! of ram and 6 mhz processor. This makes my (dated!) phone exactly 88 times as fast with 6000 times the memory. I did that calculation on my phone and if I threw in a sin(x) at the end it would have automatically graphed 88sin(x) for sh!ts and giggles. Then I could zoom out 10 times, take a screenshot, and email it to you, just because I can (in 30 seconds). Hello! Note that even if I didn't opt for a cell plan I could still use wifi. Ahem. Wifi.

Shame on the people who keep this piece of junk in the school systems as a standard. Realistically, a dedicated device of this price today could be phenomenal. Apple should make one. TI is going to (and deserves to) be brutally trounced in the calculator market for this eventually, but in the mean time they're basically restricting learning in schools to be done at a snails pace with minute functionality for a large profit, and for the massive portion bought by the school system, at your expense.
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23 of 24 people found the following review helpful
on March 3, 2010
Texas instruments has not significantly changed either the price or the calculator in the decade since I purchased mine. I have to imagine that their prices have not changed because they are the only company on the planet still purchasing 24kb ram chips and low resolution screens. This calculator probably costs them 2 dollars to make and they continue to overcharge because they have a completely captive market in schools. I imagine if you are purchasing this, you don't have a choice, but if you do, this antiquated piece of junk should be avoided at all costs.
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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
on September 12, 2000
The beginner TI (81, 82, 83) calculators are great for high school math and business type college math classes. However, if you think you're going to head towards any engineering major in college (i.e. you're going to take calculus) you will want a more powerful calculator when you get there. I bought a TI-81 when I was in high school and it was great (then). When I got to college it was fine for first quarter calculus, but by second quarter I wanted something more powerful. I ended up buying the TI-85 which had a bit more of a learning curve, but was a much more powerful and useful tool. In retrospect I wish I would have bought the TI-85 in high school, but who knew! Bottom line... If I were a high school student looking at pursueing an Engineering study path I would go for the TI-92. If I were a high school student worried just about high school or thinking of a Business study path, I would buy the TI-83. Either way the TI is a great calculator, second only to HP!
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